Meet Teresa Miller

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature longtime CIS volunteer Teresa Miller.

More than a decade ago, Teresa, who has a background as a veterinarian technician and holds a Bachelor of Science in Zoology from Michigan State University, walked into Edison Environmental Science Academy and started volunteering once a month with the Science Club. At that time, in 2007, she worked with Zoetis in Animal Health. Since 2017, she’s been employed with Stryker as an Associate Sourcing Manager. “I loved doing my volunteer work with the fourth and fifth graders. I thought I might have to give it up, though, when I started my new job, but I didn’t! I’m so lucky that Stryker allows me to continue to do this!” she says.

In fact, Teresa loves working with the students so much that she convinced her hairy, 105 pound friend, Cash, to volunteer as well. A Bernese Mountain Dog, Cash is considered part of the volunteer team who makes Science Club so successful. [Since we’ll be featuring some of the Science Club volunteers, we’ll bring you Cash’s interview this spring when he comes to visit the students at Edison.]

Born in Taylor, Michigan, Teresa, along with her husband, two children, two dogs, three cats, and two horses, now lives on a 10-acre property in Plainwell. “I love Kalamazoo and I love Plainwell. And, of course, Plainwell has the best ice cream!”

Alright, Teresa: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

Pop Quiz

As you know, the Science Club has been going strong since 2004 when Zoetis scientist [and current CIS board member] Dom Pullo started the club. It’s such a fantastic way to enhance students’ learning of science, through inquiry and hands-on activities.

It’s fun volunteering with Dom and other volunteers, like Paul. [Paul Runnels will be featured in an upcoming post, so stay tuned.] The kids are great. They ask lots of question and they are amazing questions. We encourage that. Asking questions is how you learn. They are just so inquisitive. Science, for these kids, is like magic.

What have you found to be the most rewarding aspect to volunteering?

Seeing the change and growth in the students. It’s rewarding to see the kids change from the beginning of our time together to the end. In the beginning, some are just there to get out of class, maybe wanting to do something different. At some point, that changes. They want us to come every week. When we do the slime project, there are always some kids who don’t want to touch the slime, but by the end, they are picking it up and playing with it.

What is a question you’ve asked recently?

When I started with Stryker, I had no manufacturing experience, so I asked a lot of questions. In particular, What are the different types of processing of materials?

So, for instance, when it comes to a hospital bed, part of the metal is bent metal. You do that by heating the metal to form it. And then, you have to use a different process to do another section, say with a laser to cut the holes where you want them.

Since I have gone from animals to manufacturing, I’m constantly learning something new every day and I love that. I never get bored!

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

I recently asked Alexa (my Amazon Echo) about dolphins.

Another question!

Yes! And I learned that their skin is so thick. I didn’t realize that but it makes sense as it would help them with body warmth. Orcas are dolphins and not whales. Because we call orca’s killer whales, I didn’t realize that either.

What are you currently reading? 

The last book I read was Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. I read it before I saw the movie. I cried through the entire last chapter. The book before that was A Dog’s Purpose by Bruce Cameron. That’s a movie, too, about a dog who is reincarnated. Are you sensing a theme here?

What is your favorite word right now?

Service.

What’s something you looking forward to in 2020?

I’m going on a ten day cruise this spring to celebrate my daughter’s graduation. She just got accepted into Michigan State University (MSU)!

Behind every successful person is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

My dad. The support he gives me and how he teaches. He’s the kind of person who is always teaching, telling you why he is doing something a certain way.. When he was 19 he had started working for Ford and worked for them his whole life. With no real formal education after high school, he felt it was important to get an advanced education. So when I was growing up, he was always pushing me to go to college. It wasn’t an option. In fact, he was the one who got me to consider going into the animal field.

Thank you, Teresa, for hanging out with us at Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids.

Happy Birthday, Blog!

One year ago we launched this blog: Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids. There were over 181 million blogs when we began and there are probably more than that now. The blogosphere is bloated with lots of blogs (say this sentence 10 times). So thank you, dear readers, for choosing to read this blog. To celebrate our year together, I’ve made a delicious chocolate cheesecake (recipe can be found here) and if you want a slice, stop down to our office today. We’ll be offering them on a first come, first serve basis.) In addition, we’re whooping it up by sharing 17 blogtoids* about our one-year-old blog:

  1. In one year, we offered up 53 posts; that’s basically a fresh post every Tuesday.
  2.  Donna Carroll and I welcomed 11 guest bloggers, composed of CIS staff, board, and partners. Thank you Emily, Artrella, Bethany, Melissa, James, Dom, Sandy, Pam, Bonnie, Kaitlin, and Carly for contributing your voice to this blog. Thanks to all the kids, parents, school and community partners who shared their thoughts with us. We’re looking forward to hearing more from you as well as new voices this school year.
  3.  Over half of our 53 posts have highlighted individuals or entities in this community. If all our 12,000 plus kids are going to succeed in school and life, it’s going to take a lot of committed adults working together.
  4.  All 18 of the Kalamazoo Public School buildings that have CIS (we’re in 19 schools this new year, having most recently added Woodward School for Technology & Research) have been mentioned at least once in one or more posts. We love the Kalamazoo Public Schools!
  5. We named names. And we won’t stop. We’ll continue to tell you who is making a difference for kids through CIS.
  6.  You’re smarter because of this blog. You’ve read topics here ranging from literacy, mentoring, resiliency, and music. You’ve discovered what dental care and food have to do with academic success. You’ve read impressive phrases (thanks to guest blogger like CIS board member and partner Dom Pullo) such as “students mixed chemicals that created a chemiluminscent reaction…”
  7.  Three of our posts caught the attention of National CIS. Woo, hoo!
  8.  Most cried over blog post: Open Letter to A Father Who Will Never Read This.
  9.  Funniest post: Don’t Name Your Blog “The Blog.”
  10.  Post that received the most response from teachers and other school staff: Cast Your Vote for Kids.
  11.  Post that featured our hairiest school volunteers: Kaitlin Martin’s Paws for Stories.
  12.  Hardest post to write: Engineers of the Heart.
  13.  Funnest post to write: Six and a Half Things to Do While We’re Away.
  14.  Most fashionable post: Threads.
  15.  Post that featured one of our favorite student interviews: Pop Quiz: Lincoln International Studies Student.
  16.  Hardest thing about blogging? Coming up with a title for each post that is provocative without being too provocative. It needs to be something catchy that will make you want to read more than just the title.
  17. Most rewarding thing about blogging? Seeing and sharing CIS in action—with you, the partners, volunteers, donors, parents, staff, and learning about the wonderful students who are empowered because of your support.

We have only begun to introduce you to some of your 12,000 kids and the hundreds of caring adults who are helping to raise them. Stay with us this year and continue to get a behind the scenes glimpse of CIS in action. At Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids you will continue to meet the talented teachers, hard working principals, and dedicated community volunteers, partners, and CIS staff who are empowering our children to succeed. We look forward to turning two with you.

*A blogtoid is a term I made up just for this post. (I hope this makes you feel special!) A blogtoid is a fact or deeply held opinion about a blog.

Birthday Candles

Where Was Dom When We Were In Fifth Grade?

Edison StudentSpring is here. And our newsletter, CIS Connections, is almost here too, making its way to 2,000 of you. This attendance-themed newsletter will be available on our website, snuggled alongside other archived gems. Featured in this issue is an interview with CIS Board member, Dom Pullo. A Scientist from Zoetis (formerly Pfizer Animal  Health), Dom has been volunteering with Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo since 2004. For nine years, he has been showing up to run a science club that Kalamazoo Public School students clamor to attend. Pretty good attendance record, don’t you think?

Take a sneak peek as Dom, in his own words, describes the experiments he and Kelly Kievit, a Zoetis colleague, are doing with children at Edison Environmental Science Academy along with the support of Eric Clark, Field Enrichment Coordinator with Kalamazoo Public Schools. After reading it, check out these pictures on our Facebook album, taken by Freshwater Photography.

Edison Students w GlovesThe experiments, discussion and demonstrations we provide are not run of the mill fifth grade lessons, but we do try to align some of the content with the curriculum. For example, last month we conducted experiments where the students mixed chemicals that created a chemiluminscent reaction. Or, in other words “light.” This aligns with their early investigations into energy in a fun way. We also discuss other reactions that generate light like bioluminescence found in animals and plants, phosphorescence and fluorescence and provide some “around the house” examples. We discuss what is happening at an atomic level, describing the excitation and relaxation of electrons into the “ground-state” and that the energy given off is in the spectrum of energy we see as light. We help them make a “kid-connection” of the “excited state” and “ground state” of electrons by drawing an analogy to the playground! They love it…and it’s our very first experiment of the year. We then link this to Glow Sticks…something they know, and now understand how they work… through science!

Edison Student Raising HandWe’ll venture into statistics to understand the mathematical concepts of averages and probability. We’ll extract DNA from split peas and investigate circuit theory. In the past we’ve made batteries out of lemons, made Astrolabes, (an ancient navigational aid) and compared them to modern day GPS satellites. Then there are the demonstrations like our kick-off “explosion” where I pour boiling water into a bucket of liquid nitrogen! A definite crowd pleaser for all ages! And this year, a finale, where I’ll crush a 50 gallon drum with 1 gallon of water (shh!) An exciting way to discuss the states of matter! At the end of the year we host a “game show” like “Jeopardy.” The kids retain so much of the information presented; it amazes me every year!