Welcome, Dr. Montgomery!

Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo welcomes the ninth president of Western Michigan University, Dr. Edward Montgomery, who began his tenure one week ago.

Western Michigan University partners with Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo (CIS) throughout 20 Kalamazoo Public schools to help kids stay in school and achieve in life. Here are just a few ways WMU has worked with CIS and the Kalamazoo Public Schools to support our 12,000+ kids:

 

 

We look forward to our continued partnership with WMU and what the future will bring with Dr. Montgomery at the helm.

Dr. Montgomery earned a bachelor’s degree from Pennsylvania State University and both master’s and doctoral degrees in economics from Harvard University. He comes to WMU from Georgetown University where he served as professor of economics and dean of the McCourt School of Public Policy since 2010. No stranger to Kalamazoo, he has coauthored research with CIS Board Member Randall Eberts of the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research—not to mention that his son is a recent WMU grad!

You can learn more about WMU’s new president, Dr. Edward Montgomery, by clicking on the links below:

Official WMU biography: http://wmich.edu/president/biography

Go here for Second Wave Media’s “Nine questions about Dr. Edward B. Montgomery, WMU’s ninth president.”

WMUK’s Gordon Evans interviewed Dr. Montgomery in May and rebroadcast it last week on WestSouthwest. You can listen to it here.

Click here for “10 things to know about Western Michigan University’s new president” from MLIVE.

Pop Quiz: David Hamilton

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature David Hamilton. A former youth development worker with Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo (CIS), at the start of the school year David began serving as an AmeriCorps VISTA with CIS at Kalamazoo Central and Washington Writers Academy. Originally from Detroit, David graduated from Cass Tech High School and has just completed his studies in health administration at Western Michigan University, graduating with his bachelor’s this Spring. David is also featured in the most recent CIS Connections, with the “Double” theme. You can read the full issue here.

Alright, David: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

POP QUIZ

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

That in Kalamazoo, in general, kids struggle here, too. Coming from Detroit, it took me by surprise and feels a bit ironic. We have this great thing, the Kalamazoo Promise, yet not every kid is in the right state to receive and take advantage of it. Through my work with Communities In Schools I’ve learned there are many other underlying issues that can get in the way.

Such as?

There are many factors, but homelessness is a big deal, hunger, and other basic needs. CIS does a very good job of getting those resources so they can be break down those barriers that students face on a daily basis, whatever those students may need to alleviates some of those challenges.

Favorite word?

Right now it’s serendipitous. I feel like a lot of things that have come about in my life are serendipitous. I try and see them as opportunities and take advantage of them.

What are you currently reading?

The Last Dropout by Bill Milliken. It’s a book that I have found to be very informative on the causes of the pressing issue that students face. It also speaks to chronic absenteeism. [David talks more about this in the latest CIS Connections.]

What is something people may be surprised to know about you?

I have a huge interest in roller skating. I’ve been to Ohio and Atlanta. I’m going to Benton Harbor. I literally skate every Tuesday. You can get into Roller World for only a dollar.

Skating is a really big culture. We enrolled in a 100 day class called Starting Gate at Western. It’s a small incubator class that helps students develop their entrepreneurial ideas. And, of course, ours is to develop a skating rink in Kalamazoo.

We?

My twin, my companion in life. We enrolled in the class together after we started skating this past summer. We’ve got surprisingly good at it.We made the right decision, taking that class, it’s been beneficial. We’re looking for a location so kids don’t have to worry about transportation. We want to offer a positive, fun, clean environment for kids. Skating is something you have to be introduced to; you don’t generally seek it out. You can dance, ballroom dance, and hustle on skates. It’s fun.

David (on left) with brother Daniel

What’s the best part about being a twin?

The companionship and the support we get from each other. Obviously, we’re so close in age so we can relate to things together and they happen to be a family member.

What’s the hardest part?

When you don’t see eye-to-eye. It’s hard to disagree with a family member. I am the oldest, and he needs to learn his own lessons. I can’t forewarn him and that can be hard.

You’re the oldest?

Technically. By five minutes. At times we’ll do something and it will make me remember I’m the oldest. For instance, both of us chose to join the fraternity. I tested the ground waters first and laid the foundation. Then I asked him what he thought about it and he said, If you think it’s going to be beneficial, I’ll do it.

You’re a busy college student. How did you come to work with Communities In Schools?

I was looking for an internship for the summer and I wanted something that would help me hone my skills in administration and mentoring kids. I wanted to do AmeriCorps VISTA. I applied but I missed the deadline. So I applied to be a youth development worker for CIS Think Summer. It was one of the most exciting and rewarding experiences I’ve had in my life. I learned so much. I had so much support: from the other youth development workers, [CIS Site Coordinator] Ms. Yarbrough, and Ms. Artrella. I worked closely with twelve students and they were respectful and looked up to me.

I ended up applying again for VISTA, attended the August 23rd VISTA training and began my VISTA work at the start of school year. My time is divided between Kalamazoo Central and Washington Writers Academy.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

I’m looking to pursue my masters in counseling psychology. Ultimately, I want to end up in administration in higher education.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who is your caring adult?

My parents. Until recently, I’ve taken for granted having a two-parent household. I see the support they give each other and all they’ve instilled things in me. If one wasn’t there, I don’t know how I would have turned out. I’ve benefited from the kindness and the nurturing of my mother as well as the sternness and motivation of my dad and his “go get it” drive. I like that. They complement each other and one doesn’t overpower the other.

Thank you, David!

 

Three New Sparks with CIS

From left to right: Ellen Sudeikis, Tate Vogt, and Jamie Morgan.

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we have compiled some answers from the newest members of our CIS family: our interns!

All three fabulous Western Michigan University students are working towards their bachelor’s degree in the School of Social Work. Here they are, in no particular order (drum roll, please): Tate Vogt (from Jackson, Michigan) is with the CIS team at Northglade Montessori Magnet School, Ellen Sudeikis (from Chicago, Illinois) is with the CIS team at Spring Valley Center for Exploration, and Jamie Morgan (from Albion, Michigan) has joined the CIS team at King-Westwood Elementary School.

Alright, interns: pencils out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

  • All about ethics
  • How to change the power steering lines
  • The new WMU football coach played for the Broncos during his undergrad at Western

What are you currently reading?

  • Lord of the Flies/ The Giver
  • Harry Potter
  • Me Before You

 What do you love about Kalamazoo?

  • The breweries and taphouses culture-bringing people together
  • The variety of restaurants
  • How nice everyone is, especially in comparison to Chicago!

What do you want to be when you grow up?

  • A substance abuse counselor
  • A good father
  • A social worker and a mom

What is your favorite word right now?

  • Soda pop
  • Absolutely, as in “Absolutely, I’d love to do that.” When someone says that, it makes you feel like they really want you to be there.
  • Passionate

Will you share with us something that has been on your mind lately?

  • The election and beyond
  • Time management
  • How am I going to manage taking four classes, working at Red Lobster five times a week, and interning for 30 hours?

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

  • My mother and father. My mother helps me with all my needs and my father pushes me.
  • My father, He supports me in many ways. He is my rock.
  • My brother is my caring adult.

Thank you, interns. Welcome aboard!

Introduction To Mindfulness: How It Helps Students

Today’s guest blogger is Jessica Smith, Western Michigan University MSW Intern at Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. 

Jessica-300x300My name is Jessica Smith, I am an MSW (Masters of Social Work) intern at Parkwood-Upjohn Elementary through Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. I graduated from Ferris State University in May 2014 with a Bachelor of Social Work and a Bachelor of Science in Technical and Professional Communication. I am pursuing my School of Social Work certificate and I will be graduating with my MSW in April 2016.

Since I began my internship with CIS, I was invited by Deb Faling of CIS to help run a mindfulness group at Woods Lake Elementary School, which hosts the after school program, Kids In Tune.

Prior to helping run the mindfulness groups, I was not aware of just how useful mindfulness can be in helping with concentration, focus, managing emotions and creating a more peaceful environment. I’ve practiced it myself and have noticed it has a positive effect on my thoughts and feelings.

What exactly is mindfulness and how does it help students?

Mindfulness is defined as, “maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment.” (Source: http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/mindfulness/definition)

Many students in the mindfulness group have expressed positive feelings about the activity. Students have said they feel more “calm” and “relaxed” as a result of practicing mindful behaviors and mindfulness-oriented activities.

I’ve observed that students in the mindfulness group are indeed calmer, more aware of their feelings, their environment and demonstrate compassion towards themselves and others. They have demonstrated more patience and appear to be more “present” in the exact moment they are in.

I will be writing a series on mindful activities the students of the mindfulness group at Kids In Tune have been doing all year long:

Upcoming topics of mindful activities:

• Mindful breathing
• Mindful seeing
• Mindful hearing
• Mindful walking
• Mindful eating

My first post in the series will be about mindful breathing, which will be published in the upcoming weeks. Check out “Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids” for the latest on CIS news and events.

Caring Adult: Olivia Gabor-pierce

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Nicholas Baxter, about to embark on his AmeriCorps VISTA journey with CIS, is seen here, taking his Oath of Service.

It’s time again to think back to when you were young and in school and recall that caring adult you felt especially connected to. Maybe it was in elementary school, or perhaps it was middle or high school. Who is that special person, who, even after all these years, you still carry within your hearts?

Members of the fabulous CIS team at Edison Environmental Science Academy have been taking up the challenge and sharing their caring adult. You’ve read about Principal Julie McDonald’s, CIS After School Coordinator Stacy Salters‘ caring adult. As I was preparing to run the post on AmeriCorps VISTANicholas Baxter’s caring adult, he informed me that he didn’t have a caring adult in his elementary or high school years and “so I chose the most attractive elementary teacher I had and although I do remember her being nice and, well, memorable she is not my most caring adult. I don’t recall anyone being a caring adult until college…”

NickSo, here now is Nick’s reflection about his real caring adult…

At Western Michigan University I had a German professor named Olivia Gabor-Pierce. She was the first person I ever met who spoke four languages and wrote books. She was incredibly intelligent and challenged our intellects inside and outside of class. We thought critically about the language we were learning; she loved that.

Throughout my entire college career she was always the professor who was able to ground me in a few words. No matter what was going on or how stressful things were, her caring, open, and loving demeanor instantly calmed life around us. She was the first person who ever truly pushed my abilities beyond what I thought possible, she saw things in me I never was able to see.

Nick leading students in a “Keep the Lights On After School” chant he wrote.
Nick leading students in a “Keep the Lights On After School” chant he wrote.

She told me I must go to Bonn.  “You must go to Bonn,” she said. It became a meta mantra that was engrained in my subconscious until I actually did go and realized a whole new perspective on life. Because of her heart always being open to her students, my eyes were opened to the world and for that I thank her and believe she deserves the spot of my caring adult.

Nicholas A. Baxter, AmeriCorps VISTA

Caring Adult Series: Mr. Blink

Johnny featured with some caring adults. Back,from left: CIS After School Coordinator Stacy Salters, KPS Principal Julie McDonald, KPS Teacher Chad Chambless.
Johnny featured with some caring adults. Back,from left: CIS After School Coordinator Stacy Salters, KPS Principal Julie McDonald, KPS Teacher Chad Chambless.

If you follow our blog, you know that CIS has been asking caring adults to think back to when they were young and in school and recall that caring adult they felt especially connected to. Maybe it was in elementary school, or perhaps it was middle or high school. Who is that special person, that, even after all these years, they still carry within their hearts?

Members of the CIS team at Edison Environmental Science Academy were up to the challenge and in the weeks to come, we’ll find out who their caring adults are as we will publish each of their letters.

Today, we are excited to share a letter written by one member of the passionate, talented, and dedicated team who infuse Edison Environmental Science Academy with hope, love, and learning.

 

Dear Mr. Blink,

Many people do not believe I was ever a shy person.  Thirty six years ago, you had that shy 7th grader in your social studies classroom and on your volleyball team.  My brother was a star football player at the high school, breaking all sorts of records.  I was known as “Dean’s little sister” or “little Sharick.”  I was 12, trying to figure out who I was, what I stood for, and who my friends were.

Honestly, I don’t remember you doing anything particularly special just for me, but you made me feel special, gave me my own voice and always called me by my first name.  You allowed me to be a typical 7th grade girl – moody and well, a 7th grade girl.   You would talk about choosing friends wisely and being true to yourself.  As an adult and an educator, I now see that you took every advantage of “teachable moments.” By the time I started 8th grade, I was a new person, no longer as shy, knowing who I was (at least as much as a teenager can), and chose my friends wisely.  Most of my best friends are friends of 30+ years!

Thank you for taking this shy, 12 year old under your wing and allowing me to fly.  You were an integral part of my decision to become a teacher.  I hope I have made a difference in my students’ lives just as you have mine.

Thank you so much,

Julie (Sharick) McDonald, M.A.

Principal
Edison Environmental Science Academy
Kalamazoo Public Schools
 
 

Who is your Mr. Blink? If you are up to the challenge of reflecting on and writing a letter to your caring adult, email it to me at jclark@ciskalamazoo.org and we just might publish it!

And, if you haven’t yet had a chance to read the Story of Success within our freshly published annual report, take a few minutes to learn how KPS Principal Julie McDonald, her fabulous teaching staff, CIS staff, and other caring adults are helping Johnny succeed. Hint: To address the needs of the whole child, it often takes more than one person, one organization or resource. Johnny identifies a number of caring adults that have empowered him and gives a special shout out to: The Kalamazoo Promise®, Friday Food Packs (made possible thanks to Kalamazoo Loaves & Fishes), First Day Shoe Fund, the Edison School Based Health Center (staffed by Family Health Center), Open Roads, and WMU College of Aviation.  These last two resources are offered as part of CIS After School Programming funded through the Michigan Department of Education, 21st Century Community Learning Centers.

 

Pop Quiz: The CIS Interns Of 2014!

PencilsHave you voted today?No? Well, then, go ahead. We’ll wait… Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we have compiled some answers from the newest members of our CIS family: our 2014/2015 interns! We have 12 fabulous students from Western Michigan University. Nine are working on their master’s or bachelor’s degree in the School of Social Work and three are working towards their bachelor’s degree in health. Here they are, in no particular order (drum roll, please): Kendra McCarthy, Rebecca Mohney, Jessica Smith, Victoria Kiel, Alexis Maciarz, Shawn Jones, Katie Palazzolo, Gretchen Schultz, John Schneider, Edward Kamar, Luis Hernandez, and Alexis Noel.

Alright, interns: pencils out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

  • Recently, I’ve learned what dual assessment is; I’m still learning. I’m also learning about cultural humility.
  • I work as a phlebotomist and am also taking the class, Spanish for Health Professionals. I recently learned a phrase to use with patients: Necesito quitarle un poco sangre por favor!
  • I recently learned that schizophrenia may be caused by eight different diseases.
  • More about holistic health…successful aging regarding older people and health coaching. How to help people help themselves by giving them the tools they need.
  • The variety of services that are coordinated through CIS in the schools, like the dental van and food packs, working with Loaves & Fishes.
  • Recently, I’ve learned a lot about mindfulness.
  • I’ve learned how to change my car’s oil.
  • I recently learned some very important vocabulary words for my G.R.E. Also, learned the format of the test.
  • I learn almost every day from my co-workers different strategies while working with groups.
  • CIS is involved in 20 KPS schools.

What are you currently reading?

  • Stranger from a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein
  • Textbooks
  • Who Moved My Cheese?, The Ice Cream Maker, and Successful Aging
  • Gone Girl
  • Good to Great
  • Stress Test by Timothy Geithner
  • The Fault in Our Stars
  • GRE Prep Manual
  • Grace and Grit by Lilly Ledbetter

What do you want to be when you grow up?

  • Social worker
  • Pediatric PA
  • School social worker and continue my passion of writing
  • Social worker in the schools or working with children who have developmental delays
  • Social worker in school setting
  • A great social worker
  • Still uncertain, but want to help children become independent and reach their potential
  • Physicians Assistant
  • Venturer

What is your favorite word right now?

  • Heyo! It means the same as new.
  • Travel. I have the opportunity to travel around Southeast Asia when I graduate and could not be more excited.
  • Colloquial
  • Be mindful, be present in the moment. Don’t rush. Relax.
  • Stress free
  • Conquer
  • Faith
  • Graduation
  • Yes, because it is a positive word.
  • Bazinga
  • Cat

Will you share with us something that has been on your mind lately?

  • Trying to figure out what I want to focus on within social work.
  • I am trying to decide what I will do after graduation—so many options but some involve tough choices.
  • I am worried that I will stress out too much with my job, my classes, internship, not get enough sleep. I need to learn/practice self-care techniques.
  • Many different things: school, bills, relationships, internship, being mindful throughout my day.
  • How I will feel/react when something happens in my internship that makes me upset or uncomfortable.
  • Being able to manage everything all at once.
  • Time management, as it pertains to school and my internship.
  • Cold weather is coming. Kalamazoo needs more shelters for homeless, warm clothes, and even services for stray animals.
  • How I did on my exam yesterday.
  • My nephew and niece.
  • Multi-tasking—assignments, interning, my job.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

  • My parents. They’ve supported me financially, emotionally, and spiritually throughout my life. Even now, through grad school.
  • My AmeriCorps team leader Jessi was a huge inspiration and taught me to be an independent and strong woman while maintaining relationships.
  • My mom when I was a child and my former foster mom/dad when I was a teen.
  • My mom. My mom has always pushed me to be the best I can be and encouraged me to get an education and do well for myself.
  • My mother! My mother has been there for me my whole life and is the only person that can, first-hand, lower my stress by just a phone call. She has taught me to be strong and have faith when in a bad situation.
  • My aunt. She has always supported me. She always has high hopes for me. She was one of the only positive role models in my life.
  • My mother and father. They have always been there for me and they have built me up when I feel the most alone. I can always rely on them to give me good advice. They have been shaping me ever since I was a little girl into the person I am today.
  • My aunt. After my mom disappeared, my aunt took more of a “mom” role and became more involved in my life.
  • My grandmother. I’ve lived with her my whole life and she raised me. She’s always been there for me when I needed it the most.
  • My second grade teacher, Ms. Jeski. She was a hockey fan and made me feel special since I played hockey.
  • Ms. Aleman. She taught me English.

Don’t Quote Me

BSWs-2014-300x225
Four of the twelve new CIS interns. The BSW Social Work students (from left to right) are: Lexy Maciarz, Katie Palazzolo, Gretchen Schultz, and Victoria Kiel

As I sit down to write this post, I’ve just returned from being part of the orientation for our new interns. All twelve of them! It’s a CIS bi-annual ritual that I always look forward to; welcoming all those fresh, new faces, excited to be linked to aCIS Site Coordinator and begin their work within a Kalamazoo Public School. Deb Faling, Director of Social Emotional Learning, supervises the social work interns. “Welcoming our interns each year is like going back to school for me. My social work internships played an important role in my life. The joy of direct practice and mentorship by an experienced practitioner is the heart of what makes social work education so unique. An internship is the core process to becoming part of the profession and going on to make an impact on your chosen community. From the standpoint of our children, they benefit from one on one service by students who have specifically chosen this type of work as their life focus. These interns want to be there for our kids and they create opportunities and learning moments that stay with the children long after the internship is over.”

We’ll introduce you to this year’s nine social work and three health interns—all affiliated through our partnership with Western Michigan University—in a future blog post. Yes, we had them take our pop quiz and, being the good college and graduate students they are, they were up for the challenge! But, for now, thought you might be interested in a “behind the scenes” look at the exercise we did as a way to get to know each other better and begin the conversation about what it takes to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life.

We placed a quote in each of the four corners of the room. The interns were instructed to read each one and then stand by the quote that spoke to them the most. Then we discussed what they picked and why it resonated with them. Here are the quotes they read:

I might just be my mother’s child, but in all reality I’m everybody’s child.

Nobody raised me; I was raised in this society.

Every child you encounter is a divine appointment.

Children are the living messages we send to a time we will not see.

Children are likely to live up to what you believe of them.

Which one speaks to you? Perhaps several or all do, but which one resonates with you the most right now? Why?

Each quote, I think, speaks to a dimension of what CIS and its school and community partners are trying to do, not just here in Kalamazoo, but throughout the country: recognize that every child is our child. And, if we hold this to be true, we must expect the best and set high standards for all of our children. Every moment with every child is a moment we must seize. As CIS AmeriCorps VISTA Lauren Longwell said at the training, “Our kids need us to be consistent. They need us to be present to them. We need to show up and be there for them.” Our children learn to believe in themselves because we believe in them. And they will, as one of the interns pointed out, “live up to as low or high as we set the bar.” So we might as well set the bar high and see where it takes our kids—and us. Hey, that sounds pretty good. Okay, go ahead and quote me.

Wondering who the four quotes are attributed to? In order of how they appear above: Tupac Shakur, Wes Stafford, John Whitehead, and Lady Bird Johnson.