Spotlight on CIS Alumna, Dominique Edwards

Dominique Edwards, a 2014 graduate of Kalamazoo Central High School, is featured in this year’s 2016/17 CIS Annual Report. A CIS alumna and former board member of Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo, Dominique graduated in May with an associate’s degree in social science from  Southwestern Michigan College. She is now working on obtaining her Bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Ferris State University.  Here’s some of the conversation we had with Dominique that you won’t find in the annual report.

What does it feel like to be a Promise Scholar?

I was in 7th grade when I came to KPS, so I receive 75% of the Promise. I appreciate the Promise, I really do. Without it, I wouldn’t have gotten this far.

After graduating high school, what has been one of the biggest surprises you faced after graduation, and headed to college?

How broke you are! Even with support from a parent, it’s surprising as to how hard it is. I think there’s a misconception out there, that as long as you have the Promise, you’re set. That’s not exactly true. You have other fees, like living expenses and transportation.

Biggest challenge since graduating high school?

Becoming an adult. When you’re 18 you’re not really an adult yet. You don’t understand the gravity of what it means to be grown up until you have a light bill to pay. Light bills and paying rent, these were all wake-up calls for me. I’ve had to learn how not to depend so much on others now, like my mom, and take care of myself more.

Proudest accomplishment so far?

Getting my first real job on my own. I had gotten a job in housekeeping at the hotel I’m currently working for The Four Points Sheraton. Housekeeping is hard work! Anyways, I’d been doing it about  three and a half months, when I decided to talk to the hotel manager. “How do I get the front desk position?” I asked. “How do I move up?” After going through additional screenings, a background check, and passing a drug test, a week later I had the job!

No one called in favors for me. I did it myself. I looked into the situation, went through the whole process, and got the job. And then I got my first check!

What advice would you give to current KPS students who have not yet graduated from high school?  

Back when I was in high school, you could talk to me until you were blue in the face and I wouldn’t have heard you. Until you go through a situation, you can’t really know. I guess, my advice would be to know that there will be hard times. And when they come, keep a straight head. Talk to someone. It helps to release some of the frustrations and the anxiety of whatever you’re going through.

For someone who might not know, how would you describe CIS?

CIS is an older sibling in your school that you look up to. They look out for you and tell you that they love you but also that you need to do better. If you’re acting up in school they let you know. And if you can do better grade-wise, they tell you. CIS is like, No, you aren’t going to get away with not doing your best. You can amount to so much more. You can do better, they say, but you can also be better—as a student and a person. CIS helps you do that.

To learn more about Dominique, what it meant to her to have CIS in her school, her future goals, and more, read the CIS Annual Report. And just last week, Communities In Schools, Inc. posted a conversation Dominique had with CIS of Central Texas site coordinator Naedean Herrera. You can go here to listen to it on soundcloud. Dominique talks about the role her former CIS Site Coordinators, Artrella Cohn and Deborah Yarbrough, played in her success and she closes out the interview with some of her spoken-word poetry. 

Speaking of poetry, here is Dominique during her high school years working on her poetry craft with members of Truth Tone Records.

 

 

Pop Quiz: Dominique Edwards

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Dominique Edwards (right) with Artrella Cohn, CIS Director of Secondary Sites

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Dominique Edwards, a 2014 graduate of Kalamazoo Central High School. A CIS alumni and former board member of Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo, Dominique is currently attending Southwestern Michigan College and took time out of her busy schedule to participate in the three-day CIS Leadership Town Hall in New Orleans. She made Kalamazoo proud—serving on the Mission Possible: Communities In Schools Alumni panel.

We popped this quiz on Dominique while she was in the New Orleans airport waiting for Delta 1603 to arrive and take her back to Kalamazoo. Alright, Dominique: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

POP QUIZ

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned? 

I’ve learned that you can have fun as long as you are responsible. You must be responsible for yourself.

What are you currently reading?

My favorite book of all time is Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. I’m reading a lot of psychology and sociology books right now. English too.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

A CIS Site Coordinator. I think I finally found my niche. I love what a site coordinator does. They are the extended family that is with you throughout your school day and they care enough to know and help you after the school day has ended.

What is your favorite word right now?

Barbados. I love the letter b. It’s so smooth and there are two b’s in Barbados. Barbados. It’s just fun to say.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

My mom. My parent got divorced when I was six. My dad is a fantastic guy and is there when I need him. But I grew up in a single parent home and so my mom was the dominant force in my life and made sure I was taken care of. She went off to be a truck driver for a while but she made sure my brother and I were taken care of.

Another caring adult is Ms. Trella.  A lot of the doors that opened for me wouldn’t have been opened if it weren’t for her. Doors like the Leadership Conference—Ms. Trella put my name in for that—and to be part of the CIS campaign launch party to talk about my experiences. So many things, like, one-on-one tutoring, performing poetry in a talent showcase, a five session career workshop, being part of the Principal’s Bookclub with Mr. Washington. We read the Hunger Games series and we also went to King-Westwood and read to kindergarteners. Being a Literacy Buddy and a mentee with the PRO team.

That is a wide range of activities.

It was a domino effect. Once I got involved with CIS, one opportunity after another presented itself. I would have gone to college but I wouldn’t have enjoyed it that much and I would have dropped out after one semester. All those experiences CIS provided helped me in growing up. And now I get to go to a community college that has dorms and that is awesome.

Any advice you have for students?  

Hone your studying skills in high school so you can carry those with you into college. I also have to say that even though I didn’t feel like I was a leader, I was. So, don’t fight your leadership quality. Go for it. And don’t be afraid to put yourself outside of the box.

That’s exactly what you did this whole week. You were on the Mission Possible: Communities In Schools Alumni panel and spoke from the heart before over three hundred people. That is stepping outside of the box and really putting yourself out there.

Yes. Socially, I tend to be shy. Just attending this conference was outside the box for me. I wonder what if they don’t want to talk to me. But I pushed myself. Hi, my name is Dominique, I’d say. And I shook their hand and it went from there. It all turned out great.