Pam Dalitz: In School for Kids

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Pam Dalitz, a CIS volunteer at Spring Valley Center for Exploration, or, as she refers to the school, her “second home.” Pam also serves on the CIS Volunteer Leadership Advisory Council (VLAC), advising CIS on such things as volunteer recruitment and retainment.

Pam, who is originally from Ann Arbor, Michigan, retired one and a half years ago “from a bunch of careers.” She started as a recreation therapist, went back to school and became an exercise physiologist working in the physical therapy department at Borgess. Eventually, she attended Kalamazoo Valley Community College’s nursing program. She worked 12 years as a registered nurse and then retired from the health field.

Alright, Pam: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

Pop Quiz

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

How to teach kids to read. I didn’t really know how to do that until taking this SLD reading class. The SLD way is so different than how I learned to read as a kid. I’ve tutored multiple students and I’m currently only working with one SLD-mentored student. [To learn more about SLDRead, go here.]

Any tips you can impart when it comes to helping kids read?

Take the SLD reading course! Be open-minded. It is amazing.

What are you currently reading?

I’m always reading a lots of kids’ books, particularly The Adventures of Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey and Henry and Mudge and the Sneaky Crackers by Cynthia Rylant. I’m also reading a John Muir biography but I’m not reading that one to the kids, though. And I just picked up The Hot Cripple by Hogan Gorman from the Parchment Community Library.

What is your favorite word right now?

‘You’ve got to be kidding.’ That’s my favorite phrase at the moment: ‘You’ve got to be kidding,’ and I’ve been saying it a lot. But a favorite word? ‘Unbelievable!’ For a while, I was into ‘macabre.’ I’m off of that one now. Oh, ‘Whoa’ is another favorite. I like words!

Tell us a bit about your volunteer work with CIS.

I’m the kind of person who bores easily, but the kids make it so interesting and the work is really inviting. [CIS Site Coordinator] Martha Serio is a great boss! Also, it’s nice that there isn’t tons of paperwork.

Do you help Martha with paperwork?

No, I just go in and work with the kids, tutoring them. I also help in Ms. [Chyna] Campbell’s second grade classroom. Sometimes I’ll help with classroom papers, but now paperwork is much more fun than when I was a nurse and charting to help the hospital get reimbursed for units of morphine. By the way, Ms. Campbell is an amazing teacher and I admire her so much. She has her stuff together, and at such a young age!

I also like working with Martha. She is energetic and I find her easy to get along with because she’s very direct. I don’t have to guess what she wants. I get anxious if I don’t know what is expected of me and she lets me know. Martha goes above and beyond. She really cares, making sure students’ needs are met, whether it’s for academic, or social and emotional support. She’s always getting hold of their parents so everybody is working together to attend to the needs of the kids.

How often do you volunteer at Spring Valley?

I help in the second grade classroom two days a week. I also tutor several children two days—sometimes three—a week. I have a warm spot for kids that struggle in school. I really like working with them.

Where does that warm spot come from?

As a kid, I was given the diagnosis of ADHD [attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder]. I struggled, too. It was hard for me to stay focused, stay quiet, and stay in my seat. I would try and work in my seat and then I’d find myself across the classroom. Oh, there I go again, I’d think. I knew what was expected of me, but I just couldn’t do it. I didn’t want to be seen as “the bad kid,” but I was…

Those that have struggled in school sometimes end up being the best support for kids. So tell us, what made you decide to choose CIS as a way to share your time and talents?

I got into volunteering with CIS thanks to my hair salon, Honoré! They really should get credit for it.

We love Honoré Salon! They are a great CIS partner. [Read here how Honoré Salon, a 2016 Champ recipient, supports kids through CIS.]

I go to Kristin Peterson who—every time—does a wonderful job. I recommend her and Honoré to everyone in our community. Shaun Moskalik, the owner, I love him! Anyways, Honoré collects coats each year for CIS. I started buying up a few coats and bringing them into the salon and donating them to the cause. Then, one time, while getting my bangs cut by Mindy [Meisner], she started telling me about her volunteer work with CIS. You should talk to CIS about volunteering, she said. Kristin, Shaun and Mindy, they all encouraged me to follow up with CIS.

Even though you’ve retired from nursing, you still carry that health background with you when you work with kids. Do you have any thoughts on the health of children these days?

Yes, I worry about our kids’ health. When kids don’t have set bedtime hours, they often come to school exhausted. I’ll ask kids what their bedtime is and some say 7:30 or 8 o’clock. But others, the tired ones, are staying up late and playing video games.

I also ask students what they like to do, and while some mention playing sports, many—far too many—identify sedentary activities, like video games and watching television. You don’t hear much more about kids gathering informally to play outdoor games. I’m a huge Red Rover fan and I probably still have ruptured organs from playing that game! But seriously, that sedentary lifestyle worries me. I wonder about the heart disease and diabetes we’ll see in the future.

I must say, though, I do love seeing the healthy snacks, like fruits and pretzels, available in the school. That’s a good thing.

As a former exercise physiologist, do you see a connection between learning and movement?

Definitely. Activity is huge for learning. It gives the brain a boost in oxygen, it reduces stress, and can help kids rest their eyes a bit. There is this Go Noodle program that Spring Valley uses and the kids love it.

Never heard of it. What is Go Noodle?

They are little videos, about two minutes each, that can easily be played during the school day. It lets kids take a small break, get up and Go Noodle to burn off some steam. I think they have videos geared to all grade levels, maybe even for grown-ups. Basically, kids “noodle” for relaxation and can then re-focus. The kids love it and so do I!

Where is someplace you like to frequent in the community?

Bow in the Clouds Preserve. It’s the 60 acres of land preserve behind Nazareth Campus. Also, the Kalamazoo Nature Center. I love to hang out there.

Behind every successful person is a caring adult. Who has been one of your caring adults?

My dad was definitely one of my caring adults. He was a huge role model for me. He ran an industrial laundry. He worked 12-14 hour days but always had time to do fun, recreational activities.

Bertha Walker also comes to mind. She was a community mental health social worker and we worked together at Crisis Stabilization (which is part of Kalamazoo Community Mental Health & Substance Abuse Services but was affiliated with Borgess Hospital at that time). She was the senior staff. She was no nonsense and was all about our team getting the work done. We never doubted that she cared about us or the patients we served. She’s been gone now over eight years.

When you think back on 2018, what is one of your fondest memories that you carry with you into this new year?

My first year following retirement was last year, so I got out the bucket list. As part of a mission trip, I got to go into the gypsy camps of Romania last year and that amazed me. I also went dog sledding in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. That is something I wanted to do my whole life!

What are you most looking forward to this year?

My other volunteer is with the Sierra Club and I’m looking forward to some local and national trips with them. When I see a hint of spring, that means we’re getting closer. I can’t wait! I also love walking my dog. It’s a simple pleasure, just walking my little dog.

Thank you, Pam, for hanging out with us at Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids.

Honoré Salon

Miller-Davis
Honoré Salon owner and senior stylist Shaun Moskalik and stylist Mindy Meisner accepting Champ Award on behalf of Honoré Salon.

Today we highlight Honoré Salon, one of seven school and community partners honored with a 2016 Champ Award.  Their award was sponsored by Miller-Davis Company and CIS Board member Jen Randall presented the award.

Hairstylists are caretakers, friends, confidantes, and risk-bearers. In the business of trust, asking questions, listening, and bringing out the best in us, Honoré Salon bring these same qualities into their partnership with Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. And just as an excellent stylist is unfazed by ever-changing styles and trends, Honoré, as our partner, adjusts as needs evolve.

Honore Salon owner Shawn Moskalik (center) with some of his Honore stylists at Champs.
Honoré Salon owner and senior stylist Shaun Moskalik (center) with some of his stylists at Champs.

Earlier this school year, on the streets of downtown Kalamazoo, Honoré owner and senior stylist Shaun Moskalik bumped into Emily Kobza, Director of Development for Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. “How are things going?” he wanted to know. She updated him, mentioned CIS Kids’ Closets deodorant supply had dwindled dangerously low, and they parted ways. Later that afternoon a financial donation arrived, allowing CIS to purchase deodorant that could be distributed to CIS site teams.

“There’s no rule that says businesses need to be engaged in their community,” says Emily. “But Shaun has a passion for giving back and that passion is a spark that spreads to his staff and clients. We can’t be everywhere advocating for our kids,” Emily points out. “We need the community to help.” Truly a beautiful partner, Honoré advocates for kids and for CIS in a variety of ways. They spread the word on their website, paint the CIS logo on their storefront window, they talk to clients as they cut and style their hair, creating opportunities for their clients and the community to be involved.

For two years in a row, Honoré has “rounded up for warmth,” collecting new winter wear including coats, hats, and gloves for CIS Kids’ Closet. In addition, they have raised over $2,000 so CIS could purchase even more Kids’ Closet items for students.

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Stylist Mindy Meisner sets down her scissors one day a week and volunteers at Woods Lake. CIS Site Coordinator Maureen Cartmill says Mindy is a treasure. “She has the perfect temperament for working with our students. She’s calm and patient. She’s absolutely charmed two of our kindergarteners and her third grader knows she has the coolest tutor in the school.”

Keely Novotny, as CIS Site Coordinator at Edison Environmental Science Academy sees the impact Honoré’s support has on student success. “When students feel their best, they do better academically. Honoré gets that. By working through Communities In Schools, Shaun and his business remove barriers not just for Edison students but for students at all 20 of our CIS sites.”

Honoré Salon, we thank you for helping kids stay in school and achieve in life.