Honoré Salon

Miller-Davis
Honoré Salon owner and senior stylist Shawn Moskalik and stylist Mindy Meisner accepting Champ Award on behalf of Honoré Salon.

Today we highlight Honoré Salon, one of seven school and community partners honored with a 2016 Champ Award.  Their award was sponsored by Miller-Davis Company and CIS Board member Jen Randall presented the award.

Hairstylists are caretakers, friends, confidantes, and risk-bearers. In the business of trust, asking questions, listening, and bringing out the best in us, Honoré Salon bring these same qualities into their partnership with Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. And just as an excellent stylist is unfazed by ever-changing styles and trends, Honoré, as our partner, adjusts as needs evolve.

Honore Salon owner Shawn Moskalik (center) with some of his Honore stylists at Champs.
Honoré Salon owner and senior stylist Shawn Moskalik (center) with some of his stylists at Champs.

Earlier this school year, on the streets of downtown Kalamazoo, Honoré owner and senior stylist Shaun Moskalik bumped into Emily Kobza, Director of Development for Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. “How are things going?” he wanted to know. She updated him, mentioned CIS Kids’ Closets deodorant supply had dwindled dangerously low, and they parted ways. Later that afternoon a financial donation arrived, allowing CIS to purchase deodorant that could be distributed to CIS site teams.

“There’s no rule that says businesses need to be engaged in their community,” says Emily. “But Shaun has a passion for giving back and that passion is a spark that spreads to his staff and clients. We can’t be everywhere advocating for our kids,” Emily points out. “We need the community to help.” Truly a beautiful partner, Honoré advocates for kids and for CIS in a variety of ways. They spread the word on their website, paint the CIS logo on their storefront window, they talk to clients as they cut and style their hair, creating opportunities for their clients and the community to be involved.

For two years in a row, Honoré has “rounded up for warmth,” collecting new winter wear including coats, hats, and gloves for CIS Kids’ Closet. In addition, they have raised over $2,000 so CIS could purchase even more Kids’ Closet items for students.

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Stylist Mindy Meisner sets down her scissors one day a week and volunteers at Woods Lake. CIS Site Coordinator Maureen Cartmill says Mindy is a treasure. “She has the perfect temperament for working with our students. She’s calm and patient. She’s absolutely charmed two of our kindergarteners and her third grader knows she has the coolest tutor in the school.”

Keely Novotny, as CIS Site Coordinator at Edison Environmental Science Academy sees the impact Honoré’s support has on student success. “When students feel their best, they do better academically. Honoré gets that. By working through Communities In Schools, Shaun and his business remove barriers not just for Edison students but for students at all 20 of our CIS sites.”

Honoré Salon, we thank you for helping kids stay in school and achieve in life.

 

Poetry Fuels Young Minds

We can’t let April slip by without a nod to poetry. Whether a student is reading and writing poetry in April or December, poetry enhances literacy, builds community, aids in creative problem solving, and fosters social-emotional resilience. Students who have disengaged from learning because of problems outside of the classroom can often be re-engaged through poetry.

On the heels of the hugely successful Kalamazoo Poetry Festival, it’s clear poetry is alive and well throughout the city (and beyond). Here now are six reasons we know poetry is fueling the minds of some of our 12,000+ students, who are tapping into this ancient art form to learn about themselves and the world around them.

1. CIS AmeriCorps VISTA Nicholas Baxter believes in the power of poetry. He shares his talent and passion for poetry within the Kalamazoo Public Schools, running a poetry workshop at Arcadia Elementary School. Every Thursday, budding poets spend their lunchtime reading, writing, and learning about poetry. Here is Nicholas with (left to right) Roziya Rustamova, Aceanna Williams, Nabaa Eyddan, and Reem Ahmed.

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2.  If you didn’t get the chance to read Tristan Pierce’s poem, “Time Waits 4 No Man!” then head over to CIS Connections and read it now because, as this Parkwood student reminds us, time waits for no one.

3.  As a CIS volunteer, I recently had the pleasure of stepping into Woods Lake Elementary: A Magnet Center for the Arts and offering a poetry lesson to Mrs. Shannon Parlato’s third graders. I couldn’t help but think of Mrs. Parlato as a literacy warrior. 

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Like all great teachers, she sets clear boundaries for her students while maintaining a sense of fun and fueling their desire to learn. Every one of her students actively participated in the poetry workshop and wrote at least one poem. Woods Lake’s CIS Site Coordinator Maureen Cartmill, impressed with the students’ creativity, said, “Poetry really brings home how important and enriching vocabulary can be.”                                                                   

4.  This past March, 30 Kalamazoo Public School students read their original poems at Chenery Auditorium as part of the inaugural Spoken Word Middle School Poetry event. Superintendent Michael Rice noted that, by sharing their poems that evening, students offered the audience “a sense of who they are and how they are going to have an impact on their world.” You can read more about the event and watch the performances by going here.

5.  Friends of Poetry, an almost 40-year old organization which promotes the reading and writing of poetry throughout the greater Kalamazoo area, is gobbling up poems students throughout the area sent for consideration in their annual “Poems That Ate Our Ears” contest. While winners haven’t been announced yet, we can’t help but think of what Hillside Middle School Principal McKissack said upon reflecting on Hillside’s strong showing at the second annual MLK “Courage to Create” Celebration.

Principal McKissack out at WMU with Hillside students and staff

A number of his students made it to the semi-finalist round, read their work at Western Michigan University and took a number of top prizes in the poetry competition. He was proud, “not of the winning part, but I was overjoyed by the hard work they put into getting there—the reading, studying, the questions they asked. They didn’t give up.”

Young people, through poetry, are putting their voice out into the world. That’s a brave, beautiful, and winning act in itself.

6.  Consider this group poem, written by Mrs. Shannon Parlato’s third grade students:

Recipe for Success

First, take twenty dabs of sleep and let gently rest.

Then take food and water and pour it into a cup.

Add a lifetime of teachers for a heaping harvest

of education so that we can use the Promise

to get the career we love.

After a good long day, roll up in a blanket.

Dream of what we’ve accomplished.

Little Sprout: Planting Seeds of Success

Owner/Founder of Little Sprout Children’s Boutique accepting Champs award from CIS Board member Steve Powell and CIS Site Coordinator Maureen Cartmill.
Owner/Founder of Little Sprout Children’s Boutique accepting Champs award from CIS Board member Steve Powell and CIS Site Coordinator Maureen Cartmill.

Today we highlight Little Sprout Children’s Boutique. This CIS business partner was one of eight organizations and individuals honored  at the annual Champ Celebration.  CIS Board Member Steve Powell, along with Maureen Cartmill, CIS Site Coordinator at Woods Lake Elementary: A Magnet Center for the Arts, presented the award. 

 

In the United States, there are approximately 28 million small businesses. Over half of the country’s working population works in a small business, and small businesses have generated over 65% of the net new jobs since 1965. So it’s safe to say that small businesses are a powerful part of our community. Today, we honor one small business for impacting our community in a different way.

Little Sprout Children’s Boutique, Kalamazoo’s first specialty children’s clothing store, was opened by Jeanine Seabold in 2010.

Jeanine Seabold, Owner/Founder of Little Sprout Children’s Boutique
Jeanine Seabold, Owner/Founder of Little Sprout Children’s Boutique

During the summer of 2012, Jeanine had an idea to stage a children’s fashion show with the proceeds benefiting a local nonprofit who worked with children. Supporting the CIS Kids’ Closet seemed like the perfect fit for helping local kids and Jeanine’s business.

While this could have been a “one and done” partnership, Jeanine reached out to CIS the next summer with yet another idea: encouraging customers to donate school supplies for the CIS Kids’ Closet.  Customers would receive a discount for their donation of school supplies and Jeanine generously offered to also donate a percentage of her anniversary sales to benefit CIS.  Little Sprout has continued this partnership every year since then.

Jeanine-outside-her-storeWith half of all new businesses closing within their first five years, it would be easy for Little Sprout to focus solely on its own success.  However, Jeanine sees success of local businesses and education as intertwined, saying, “Over the years, the critical role education plays in our economic success has become more and more apparent to me. Good, strong school systems encourage people to settle in our region because industries are more apt to locate in areas that are attractive to potential employees. Also, a well-educated population tends to spark community activism and involvement. It’s important that all local businesses in our community recognize the importance of our educational system and work with educators to seek ways to improve it. That’s why we, at Little Sprout, feel it is imperative to support organizations such as CIS, who help to ensure that ALL of our communities’ children are receiving the best opportunities.”

Little Sprout Children’s Boutique, we thank you for helping kids stay in school and achieve in life.

Click here to watch Jeanine Seabold, Owner/Founder of Little Sprout Children’s Boutique  and Emily Kobza, CIS Director of Development and Business Engagement on The Lori Moore Show.

Cast Your Vote For Kids

Remember to vote today!

As Dr. Pierce said, “This may be the most important vote of your lifetime. This is a big choice. Really big. It ranks up there with what cereal you should eat in the morning.”

I guess I should mention that Dr. Pierce wasn’t referring to the 2012 elections being held throughout the United States. As Parkwood’s Behavioral Specialist, Davonne Pierce served as moderator for a recent debate held in the school’s gym. He was referring to the decision facing all Parkwood-Upjohn Elementary students, staff and families: what book should represent the school?  The two nominees were Harry Potter and The Sorcerer’s Stone vs. Diary of a Wimpy Kid, the first in the series.

CIS Site Coordinator Jody Sikkema credits Maureen Cartmill, Title One Tutor, with coming up with the idea and deepening students’ understanding of the election process. “It’s a great way,” she said, “to involve families and the students are more enriched from the experience.”

Because our son attends Parkwood, my family has been paying close attention to this particular campaign. If we (both citizens and politicians) approached campaigns more like Parkwood students, we would be an even stronger country. By seeing how well the elementary students conducted themselves, I have learned three lessons I want to share with you.

Manners count.

How we conduct ourselves with our friends and opponents matters. Just because we believe our book is better than yours doesn’t mean the other book isn’t a fine book worth reading, too. Heated, yet healthy, debates were going on at lunchtime and on Parkwood’s playground, yet there was a noticeable absence of fingerpointing and smearing the other side. Maybe if we played more on each other’s turfs, like the Parkwood students do, we would be more respectful of each other’s opinions.

As grownups, we can get wrapped up in the winning. The most important part of voting isn’t necessarily who we elect to public office. What matters most is what they do once they get there. As citizens many of us have already moved on to the next contentious election.

Neatness counts, too.

Principal Carol Steiner encouraged the children to run clean campaigns and they did. Parkwood students didn’t litter their hallways with sloppy signs, careless comments, and messy truths woven with lies. We shouldn’t either. They drew beautiful pictures, wrote legibly and asked their fellow students to “Vote For Our Book, Please!”

Go simple and save.

At the end of October, the Center for Responsive Politics projected that the cost of this 2012 elections will exceed six billion dollars. Say what? SIX BILLION??!!! I can’t even wrap my head around that figure.

We could save a lot of money (and perhaps divert some of it into education) if only we  rolled up our sleeves, pulled out the poster board, crayons and washable markers. Wouldn’t it be refreshing to see home made signs by politicians hanging in the entrance way to a grocery store or on the doors of a public library instead of invading our homes through television, computer, radio, and mail?

As this election is shaping up to be the most expensive election in U.S. history, I’ve been gathering ingredients to bake brownies to help raise funds for my son’s school. I’ve been thinking how easy it seems to spend six billion dollars on elections whereas public education in our country struggles to get the stable and adequate funding it needs to educate our youth. Even if my brownies are a bestseller, they won’t, no matter how fabulous they taste, rake in the kind of dough that our kids and their schools deserve.