Prevention Works: Strengthening Our Kids

From left: Director of Programs Lola Amos, Assistant Director Nicole Storteboom, Executive Director Danielle Sielatycki, Program Facilitator Lenye Tynes, CIS Site Coordinator Precious Miller, and Program Coordinator Katie MacDonald.

 

Today we highlight Prevention Works, honored with a 2017 Champ Award. The non-profit’s Champ award was sponsored by Borgess. CIS Board member Carolyn H. Williams presented the award.

A healthy start and a healthy future is one of the five basics that Communities In Schools believes every child needs and deserves in order to be the best student and the best person they can be. For more than a decade, CIS has turned to Prevention Works to help us create stronger, healthier students and families throughout the Kalamazoo Public Schools.

We count on Prevention Works to deliver evidence-based prevention programs that are both engaging and educational. They address substance abuse prevention, violence prevention, bullying, family life skills, parenting, sexual health and adolescent health, and they encourage young people and their families to make wise decisions and live healthy lives.

Spring Valley Center for Exploration students participating in Prevention Works program as part of CIS After School.

 

Hillside Middle School’s CIS Site Coordinator Precious Miller works closely with Prevention Works Program Director Lola Amos to connect just the right programs to the right students and classrooms. She says, “Prevention Works staff helps our students get in touch with what they’re dealing with at home and school—to put a language to what they’re experiencing. Students learn that it’s okay to share that information with those they trust, that we are here for them.”

Prevention Works at Hillside Middle School. From left: Program Facilitator Lenye Tynes, Director of Programs Lola Amos, KPS Principal Atiba McKissack, CIS Site Coordinator Precious Miller, and Prevention Works Program Coordinator Katie MacDonald.

When Prevention Works Katie McDonald and Lenye Tynes stepped into Hillside classrooms, lives changed. As one student said, “I’m not bullied anymore. They helped the bully and they helped me.” He says his grades have improved since he’s able to focus on learning and no longer worries about what will happen once he steps outside the school. “Prevention Works is an incredible resource for our students,” says Precious.

CIS Site Coordinator January Haulenbeek agrees. When she was looking to meet the needs of a group of Northglade Montessori Magnet School students—all boys, ranging from first through third grade—she turned to Prevention Works. “Sure enough,” January says, “they provided the perfect facilitator. As a recent college graduate and young professional, Matt quickly built rapport with the students. The boys looked forward to their weekly meetings with Matt. He inspired them to dream big. He helped them take responsibility for their futures by focusing them on decisions and choices they could control.”

Victoria, a seventh grader at Hillside has been a huge fan of Prevention Works since her elementary days. “Prevention Works teaches different things,” she explains, “like how to handle peer pressure and how to be responsible. They’ve taught us how to turn down alcohol and other substances. They’ve taught us how to communicate better.”

Ever since her site coordinator connected her to the Strengthening Families Program, Victoria notices the change in her own family. “We compromise more,” she says. “My mother and I went through all seven weeks and my sister and dad came twice with us. We all talk more as a family. We try and see things from each other’s point of view.”

Prevention Works, we thank you for helping kids stay in school and achieve in life.

Carolyn H. Williams (at podium) presenting the Champ Award as representatives from Prevention Works look on. From left: Executive Director Danielle Sielatycki, Program Director Lola Amos, Assistant Director Nicole Storteboom, Board Member Lisa Salay, Program Facilitator Lenye Tynes, and Program Coordinator Katie MacDonald.
CIS board member Carolyn H. Williams looks on as Executive Director Danielle Sielatycki is congratulated by Borgess sponsor representative and Chief Development Officer of Borgess Foundation Tony McDonnell on Prevention Works 2017 Champ Award.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ten Sparks

Our CIS interns: (Back row, left to right) January Haulenbeek, Dominique Jackson, Kayla Favia, Jacob Fuller, Fernando Davis, and Jacob Nota. (Front row, left to right) Kaley Monroe, Keele Sage, Suzie McNees, and Alicia Clemens.
Our CIS interns: (Back row, left to right) January Haulenbeek, Dominique Jackson, Kayla Favia, Jacob Fuller, Fernando Davis, and Jacob Nota. (Front row, left to right) Kaley Monroe, Keele Sage, Suzie McNees, and Alicia Clemens.

Let’s give a warm welcome to ten fresh, new faces who are beginning their internship with Communities In Schools, working within the Kalamazoo Public Schools. Fernando Davis, Dominique Jackson, Keelei Sage, Kaley Monroe, Suzie McNees, Jacob Nota, Alicia Clemens, Kayla Favia, January Haulenbeek, and Jacob Fuller all hail from Western Michigan University. They are working on their degrees (Bachelors and MSWs) in the School of Social Work, Interdisciplinary Health Services, and Family Studies.

Down the road, we’ll check in with two of them—both Kalamazoo Promise scholars—to see what they are learning, what if feels like to be giving back within the very school district they graduated from, and how they are helping students succeed in school. In the meantime, we popped a quiz on all ten of them and compiled their answers in no particular order. Keep reading to see how they did and what they love about Kalamazoo.

Alright, interns: pencils out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

-Communities In Schools is larger than a local agency, which is awesome!
-I’ve learned who my CIS Site Coordinator is.
-Art therapy is an amazing way for people to express and heal—I am in an expressive arts class.
-I have started to learn more about policies because two of the four classes I am taking this semester are policy classes.
-I’ve learned that I can make it from Battle Creek to Kalamazoo in under 40 minutes. (I commute every day.)
-Ostriches lay the biggest eggs.
-I recently learned that turtle meat tastes different, depending on which part you eat. Some parts taste like chicken, turkey, ham, and so on.
-I have been learning about anxiety disorders and how they affect an individual, how to cope with it, and what the medications do to you.
-I recently learned how complex a policy is. I also learned that working for the government in policy has many positive benefits.
-Horses have a blind spot right in front of their heads. Horses that jump are actually jumping blind. Crazy!!

What are you currently reading (other than school-related)?

-It is a dream book. Why we have dreams and what they mean.
-The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls
-Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Shumer and Game of Thrones
-Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
-After You (sequel to Me Before You)
-Fight Club
-Twilight. I know it’s dorky.
-The Bible
-I am not currently reading anything. I’ve had a very busy past four months due to family needs.
-I’m about to start a book called, It’s Kind of a Funny Story. I read it a long time ago but want to read it again now that I’m older.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

-Kind and compassionate.
-A therapist and public speaker.
-A high school counselor.
-A father.
-Either a school social worker or with foster care or child protective services.
-I would like to be an individual that changes lives. I would like to make a wonderful impact on many different lives.
-I want to be a school social worker.
-A social worker.
-A school social worker or maybe something in the mental health field.
-I’m not sure yet. All I know is I want to help people in some way, shape, or form.

What is your favorite word right now?

-Ridiculous
-Cheese. Cheese is my favorite food so every day I ask for cheese, whether it’s cheese fries, cheese dogs, mozzarella sticks, etc.
-Relaxing. I’ve been so busy, I’m ready to relax.
-Strive. I’m always striving to do my best in everything I do.
-Soi-disant, which means self-styled. (It’s my word of the day.)
-Run
-Onomatopoeia. It has been my favorite word since freshman English at Loy Norrix.
-Stellar
-Sassafrass, as in Sassafrass Tea. I learned about sassafrass from Blanford Nature Center, a place where I attended school.
-Movies. I like to watch lots of movies when all of my things are done.

What is one of your favorite things about Kalamazoo?

-The diversity and the closeness of the community even though it is a bigger city
-The community. Everyone works together.
-The people—love them!
-I love how friendly everyone is.
-I love the community and how there is always something to do.
The variety of different things to do, such as the different festivals (Ribfest, Island Fest, etc.)
-The connectivity with community.
Downtown. I love the events, restaurants, and all the activities to do downtown.
-The Kalamazoo Promise! And the diversity.
-Being away on my own and getting a good education.

Will you share with us something that has been on your mind lately (other than school-related)?

-Is it possible to go bald due to pulling out grey hairs?
-The new iphone. I have been interested in how “great” it is.
-My relationship with my aging animals/pets.
-Thinking about my family. We lost my grandfather last November, then my grandmother two weeks ago.
-At almost 22, I’ve made the decision to get closer with God and become more involved in the church.
-My trip to Virginia in November to visit my sister.
-My need to make time for self-care.
-How weird I think it is that I will be turning 22 years old soon.
-My trip that is coming up to Cedar Point with a few of my co-workers.
-How to grow a family business.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

-My mom. No one has been as supportive of me as she has been and she motivates me to go for my dreams.
-My father has been my caring adult since the day I was born. Also, my loving mother.
-My mom and grandparents.
-My mom.
-My grandmother.
-My mother and father.
-My caring adult has been my mom. She’s always so supporting and encouraging.
-My mom, because she does a lot for me and is always there for me.
-My mom has always been my biggest cheerleader.
-Mom, for sure!