Kalamazoo College Men’s Baseball Team: A Winning Record With Kids

Today we highlight Kalamazoo College Men’s Baseball Team, honored with a 2017 Champ Award. The team’s Champ award was sponsored by Warner, Norcross & Judd. CIS Board member Darren Timmeney presented the award.

Tommy Lasorda once said, “There are three types of baseball players: Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen and those who wonder what happens.” The young men who make up the Kalamazoo College Baseball Team and choose to volunteer with CIS are the kind who make things happen.

Since January 2013, these players have been stepping up to the plate to support students at Edison Environmental Science Academy, both during the day and as part of the CIS after school program. Students and teachers alike look forward to the players coming each and every week. These young men can be counted on to be present and fully engaged with the students. Step into the school and you might find players serving as tutors, playground friends, and offering classroom support. After school, they might be sharing dinner, conversations, and participating in recess activities with students.

(From left) Assistant Coach/Recruiting Coordinator Jake VanAlten, Brent Yelton, Aaron Schwark, Jack Clark, Ian Kobernick, Jack Dynes, Head Coach Mike Ott, and Athletic Director Kristen Smith.

While faithfully serving at Edison, some have gone on to extend support to students at other CIS sites. Phillip Hegwood, CIS After School Coordinator for Woodward School for Technology and Research, says that the two teammates supporting the Woodward students “show their passion and dedication to the students as much as if they were on the field practicing. They give 110% and the students always love when they come to volunteer.”

Edison’s CIS Site Coordinator Keely Novotny and After School Coordinator Stacy Jackson both say that it’s the team’s on-going commitment to building relationships, to mentoring and tutoring that is making a meaningful impact in the lives of the students.

The team’s head coach, Mike Ott, nurtures that sense of commitment, creating an environment in which the Hornets experience success as a team both on and off the field. Although the players maintain a full school schedule and admirable grade point averages, in addition to their baseball practices and games, they make it a priority in their busy schedules to connect with the KPS students. Some players have been that consistent presence since their freshman year and are now seniors, preparing to graduate.

Both school and CIS staff love how the students eagerly anticipate the arrival of the players. Even before the school bell rings to announce the start of day, it’s not uncommon to spot a first grader seeking out the CIS Site Coordinator and ask, “Mrs. Novotny, is Jack coming today?” Each time, she’ll say, “Yes, he’ll be here” and each time, he and all the other players prove her right.

Kalamazoo College Men’s Baseball Team, we thank you for helping kids stay in school and achieve in life.

 

What the CIS Board is Reading

It’s National Reading Month. And just like the other eleven months of the year, Communities In Schools board members are reading. Here’s a peek into what some of them are reading:

 

I am reading My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante. She is an Italian author whose true identity is unknown. The novel is part of the Neapolitan Novels set in Italy beginning in the 1950’s.

-Namita Sharma

A Short History of Nearly Everything: Special Illustrated Edition by author Bill Bryson. Also, The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory by Brian Greene. I enjoy having a couple of different books going at one time and really enjoy learning about science, the expanse of our universe, the cosmos, and oceans. I get to visit and learn more about these places by reading books.

-Darren Timmeney

 

I am reading Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You’re Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant.

-Kim R. Bloom

 

Just finished American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America by Colin Woodard. This is a fascinating book that explains the history behind why different parts of our country are different from each other and how it got that way. I’ll bet you can’t guess which of the 11 cultures Michigan belongs to? But it does make sense after you understand the history.

-Bo Snyder

 

I just finished All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr and Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. I’m currently reading The Big Short by Michael Lewis.

-Susan Einspahr

 

I have read the following books over the last month and recommend each highly:

The Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsberg by Irin Carmen & Shana Knizhnik. A wonderfully readable biography of a pioneering woman jurist and the challenges of being an attorney in the early 1960’s.

Auggie and Me: Three Wonder Stories by R.J. Palacio. Stories of the experiences of three middle school students whose lives were affected by Auggie Pullman who was the subject of the book WonderBoth books are geared to middle school age students but I enjoyed both stories because of the message of compassion developed in both stories.

Gray Mountain by John Grisham. Another legal thriller focused on the impact of clear top coal mining on the health of the people and environment in the communities where the practice takes place.

The Other Wes Moore:  One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore.  The parallel lives of two black men born within blocks of one another with the same name but with different life outcomes.

The Boys in the Boat:  Nine American and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown.  A N.Y. Times best seller about the lives of the University of Washington crew who trained, qualified and eventually won gold in the 1936 Olympic games held in Berlin, Germany before World War II.

-Carolyn H. Williams

 

If you missed the post on what CIS staff are reading, go here. You can look forward to an upcoming post in which we’ll share what CIS volunteers are reading!

 

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