Pop Quiz: Jenna Cooperrider  

img_3224Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Jenna Cooperrider, now in her second year as CIS Success Coach for Kalamazoo Central High School. CIS Success Coaches allow Communities In Schools to have a larger footprint in larger schools. CIS Success Coaches are an extension—a more expansive one—of the case management model. It allows CIS to delve more deeply into a school, to meet student needs. For students who need a moderate degree of support, having that one-on-one support from Jenna or her colleague, O’Neal Ollie, CIS Success Coach at Loy Norrix High School, can be the tipping point that gets students on track and on the road to graduation.

Jenna hails from Waterford, Michigan. She received her undergraduate degrees in English and Psychology from the University of Michigan. She then attended Wayne State University where she earned her Masters in Social Work. Jenna works closely with CIS Site Coordinator Deborah Yarbrough and she says, “I love when we see the positive changes in kids from working with them. We have a student who was failing and is now passing all his classes—and you know that if you weren’t there, it could have been a different situation.”

Alright, Ms. Cooperrider: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

POP QUIZ

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

On fleek.

Pardon?

On fleek. I heard students mentioning this word, using it quite a bit, and thought it was a website. But, it means on-point. My hair’s on fleek.

I feel five percent hipper now.

Yea, the kids really keep me up to date. I like how they teach me things.

Favorite word?

Vacation.

What are you currently reading?

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon. It takes place during the Second World War. Kavalier and Clay are cousins, one just escaped from the Czech Republic and one from New York City and they create a new superhero and get a contract to start a new comic book.

As you know, attendance is one of our goals at CIS this year. As a success coach, what is one of the main reasons some kids struggle with attendance?

That’s a hard question to answer. When it comes to attendance, it’s really student specific as to why a particular student isn’t coming to school. There can be common denominators, but when it comes down to asking students, it’s not always the same answer.

What are some of the reasons you hear?

Not having an alarm clock is a big one. Sometimes, students miss the bus and they just don’t have a ride to school. Some don’t like school. Some stay home with a sick brother or sister because their parents have to work. Sometimes, it just takes a phone call to the parents. “What do you mean my kid isn’t in school?” they sometimes say. And then a half hour later that student is in school.

For instance, I’ve worked with a student who was struggling with his attendance. Turns out, he had spotty and unreliable transportation. He was also homeless. I worked closely with Mr. Schrum, our homeless liaison here at Kalamazoo Central. He’s one of our go-to people for resources for kids in these situations. He got the student bus tokens. And now, a school bus picks the student up.

When it comes to addressing attendance issues, CIS needs to not only work with the student, but work closely with the school and also communicate with parents, letting them know what resources are available to help.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who is your caring adult?

Besides the obvious—my mom and my dad—I would say my grandma. She was a single mom. She worked really, really hard to support my mom and my aunt. She’s the epitome of hard work. She worked at General Motors while raising two kids on her own. She’s feisty and says what she thinks. I don’t always want to hear what she has to say but she’ll tell me anyways. I respect that.

Thank you, Jenna!

 

 

Pop Quiz: Tyesha Moore 

TyeshaWelcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Tyesha Moore. A former Milwood Elementary and Linden Grove Middle School student, Tyesha is now a sophomore at Kalamazoo Central High School. She became involved with Communities In Schools in ninth grade. “I met [CIS Success Coach] Ms. Cooperrider through [CIS Site Coordinator] Ms. Yarbrough,” she says. “Both help me, are there even through my toughest times.” As Tyesha puts it, “They have both taken me under their wings and now Ms. Cooperrider is keeping me on her watch.”

Jenna Cooperrider describes Tyesha as “really smart and sweet.” Tyesha describes herself as “shy.” This school year, this young woman is stepping out of her comfort zone to explore her passion for writing by taking a slam poetry class with English teacher, Christopher Bullmer.

Alright, Tyesha: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

POP QUIZ

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

Never give up. I never give up on certain things, even though it’s really hard. Also, when somebody gets in your way, move around them, and breathe! I’m trying to do good, but it’s a struggle.

Favorite word?

Roses, because I like roses. I want to get a tattoo in honor of my little niece that passed away. I want it to be beautiful. I love the color blue and my niece loved the color pink and so a rose with those colors, that is what I have in mind for getting a tattoo.

Poetry is an important part of your life. Can you share a little bit about when you started writing? Your writing routine?

I’ve been writing poetry since I was fourteen. I carry a notebook with me so I can write when I need to. Sometimes I write every day. Sometimes, every other day.

notebook

Three words that come to mind after reading some of your poems: deep, dark, and real. Is that a fair statement?

Yes, my poetry is about my life and expressing how I feel.

The poet Rita Dove has said, “Poetry is language at its most distilled and most powerful.” Do you agree?

I think I do. Poetry is a type of power you put into your words. I write whatever I feel and whatever is around me.

What are you currently reading?

I just finished a good book. I can’t remember the title now and I already turned it back to the school library, but it’s about a girl who has two separate families. One is the real one and the other family kidnapped her but she said they didn’t.

What are your plans upon graduating from high school?

I want to travel to an art institute, attend college out of state somewhere and work on my poetry.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who is your caring adult?

My mother. She takes care of me. She has eleven kids and I am the baby of the family. Her kids have all grown up to be what they want to be. For instance, my older sister is a banker.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

I envision myself doing a couple things. I’ve always wanted to be a famous artist and also go into modeling. But, with modeling, you have got to be perfect. I’m not perfect so I think I’m going to do something that mixes poetry and art.

Thank you, Tyesha!

Pop Quiz: O’Neal Ollie  

O'Neal Ollie
O’Neal Ollie, CIS Success Coach at Loy Norrix High School

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature O’Neal Ollie who is the CIS Success Coach at Loy Norrix High School. CIS Success Coaches allow Communities In Schools to have a larger footprint in larger schools. CIS Success Coaches are an extension—a more expansive one—of the case management model. It allows CIS to delve more deeply into a school, to meet student needs. For students who need a moderate degree of support, having that one-on-one coaching support from O’Neal Ollie can be the tipping point that gets them over the hump and on the road to graduation.

A graduate of Kalamazoo Central High School, O’Neal then headed to school in Riverside, California and later returned to Kalamazoo, graduating in Sports Management from Western Michigan University. Today, O’Neal and his wife Terri are proud KPS parents of son Bass, a senior at Kalamazoo Central High School who is also enrolled in college, and daughter, Symphony, who graduated from Kalamazoo Central, was honored by the YWCA in 2014 as a Young Women of Achievement, and is now in her third year at Michigan State University. O’Neal notes that “it’s my wife Terri who keeps all of us on track.”

Alright, Coach Ollie: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

POP QUIZ

O'Neal with Dareon, CIS Alumni
O’Neal with Dareon, CIS Alumni

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

Oh, my goodness. I learn so much stuff. For a person that thinks he knows everything, well, that is a tough one. Okay, I learned about dual enrollment. That is the process of enrolling a student in college while they are still completing high school with eligibility to play high school sports. My son is a senior at Kalamazoo Central and plays three sports.

Favorite word?

At this time of the year, it is football because my son is in his senior year.

What are you currently reading?

Sports Illustrated, because of the Olympics, which were so good with swimming, gymnastics, and track.

You graduated from Kalamazoo Central. Thinking back to your years with the Kalamazoo Public Schools, who was one of your favorite teachers?

Vern Davis and Clarence Gardener. Also, Coach Don Jackson. He taught PE, probably one of my biggest mentors in school. Mr. Davis was a math teacher and Mr. Gardner was general business & accounting. Both coached as well.

My counselor was Nelson Stevenson and he was my main man. He enrolled me in Upward Bound. That was my introduction to college. We stayed on Western’s campus-in Bigelow Hall-for eight weeks. I learned the social aspects of college and thought, this is going to be great! I have life-long friends that I made from attending Outward Bound.

Mr. Davis made you feel so good about yourself. He made it easy to learn. It probably helped that he was a former NFL player. He played for the Philadelphia Eagles and was All-American. I had his class fourth hour. “Don’t ever make me come look for you,” he’d say.

Coach Gardiner’s business and accounting was the most useful class I’ve ever taken. I still write my checks the way he taught me in school. When I went to college, I majored in accounting until I changed to sports management.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

I’ve always been interested in school and sports administration. But, regardless of all I’m doing work-wise, I can’t forget I’m a dad. I learn a lot from my son and daughter.

Montrell Baker, CIS Site Coordinator at Loy Norrix, with O'Neal
Montrell Baker, CIS Site Coordinator at Loy Norrix, with O’Neal

Like what?

Things I never expected to learn, like, what it means to go prom dress shopping. That is a whole process and it’s a family event.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who is your caring adult?

My mom, my second mom, and my third mom. I have eight older siblings and my oldest sister, Ida Buchanan, was a secretary in my building when I was in high school. I would much rather my mother than my sister Ida get a hold of me. She did not play. Still doesn’t. She still works, going between Hillside and Linden Grove Middle School.

My mom, I always appreciated how hard she worked and the way she had a way of breaking things down to make us understand things. One of my favorite quotes she said was when I came home crying one day. “You’re crying because folks are talking about you?” she said. “You start crying when folks stop talking about you.”

Thank you, Coach Ollie!

We continue to talk about O’Neal Ollie in our soon to be released newsletter, CIS Connections. O’Neal and his CIS site team member, CIS Site Coordinator Montrell Baker, share their insights about helping students get on track to graduation. And if you missed Montrell’s interview with Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids, you can read it here.

Ten Sparks

Our CIS interns: (Back row, left to right) January Haulenbeek, Dominique Jackson, Kayla Favia, Jacob Fuller, Fernando Davis, and Jacob Nota. (Front row, left to right) Kaley Monroe, Keele Sage, Suzie McNees, and Alicia Clemens.
Our CIS interns: (Back row, left to right) January Haulenbeek, Dominique Jackson, Kayla Favia, Jacob Fuller, Fernando Davis, and Jacob Nota. (Front row, left to right) Kaley Monroe, Keele Sage, Suzie McNees, and Alicia Clemens.

Let’s give a warm welcome to ten fresh, new faces who are beginning their internship with Communities In Schools, working within the Kalamazoo Public Schools. Fernando Davis, Dominique Jackson, Keelei Sage, Kaley Monroe, Suzie McNees, Jacob Nota, Alicia Clemens, Kayla Favia, January Haulenbeek, and Jacob Fuller all hail from Western Michigan University. They are working on their degrees (Bachelors and MSWs) in the School of Social Work, Interdisciplinary Health Services, and Family Studies.

Down the road, we’ll check in with two of them—both Kalamazoo Promise scholars—to see what they are learning, what if feels like to be giving back within the very school district they graduated from, and how they are helping students succeed in school. In the meantime, we popped a quiz on all ten of them and compiled their answers in no particular order. Keep reading to see how they did and what they love about Kalamazoo.

Alright, interns: pencils out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

-Communities In Schools is larger than a local agency, which is awesome!
-I’ve learned who my CIS Site Coordinator is.
-Art therapy is an amazing way for people to express and heal—I am in an expressive arts class.
-I have started to learn more about policies because two of the four classes I am taking this semester are policy classes.
-I’ve learned that I can make it from Battle Creek to Kalamazoo in under 40 minutes. (I commute every day.)
-Ostriches lay the biggest eggs.
-I recently learned that turtle meat tastes different, depending on which part you eat. Some parts taste like chicken, turkey, ham, and so on.
-I have been learning about anxiety disorders and how they affect an individual, how to cope with it, and what the medications do to you.
-I recently learned how complex a policy is. I also learned that working for the government in policy has many positive benefits.
-Horses have a blind spot right in front of their heads. Horses that jump are actually jumping blind. Crazy!!

What are you currently reading (other than school-related)?

-It is a dream book. Why we have dreams and what they mean.
-The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls
-Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Shumer and Game of Thrones
-Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
-After You (sequel to Me Before You)
-Fight Club
-Twilight. I know it’s dorky.
-The Bible
-I am not currently reading anything. I’ve had a very busy past four months due to family needs.
-I’m about to start a book called, It’s Kind of a Funny Story. I read it a long time ago but want to read it again now that I’m older.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

-Kind and compassionate.
-A therapist and public speaker.
-A high school counselor.
-A father.
-Either a school social worker or with foster care or child protective services.
-I would like to be an individual that changes lives. I would like to make a wonderful impact on many different lives.
-I want to be a school social worker.
-A social worker.
-A school social worker or maybe something in the mental health field.
-I’m not sure yet. All I know is I want to help people in some way, shape, or form.

What is your favorite word right now?

-Ridiculous
-Cheese. Cheese is my favorite food so every day I ask for cheese, whether it’s cheese fries, cheese dogs, mozzarella sticks, etc.
-Relaxing. I’ve been so busy, I’m ready to relax.
-Strive. I’m always striving to do my best in everything I do.
-Soi-disant, which means self-styled. (It’s my word of the day.)
-Run
-Onomatopoeia. It has been my favorite word since freshman English at Loy Norrix.
-Stellar
-Sassafrass, as in Sassafrass Tea. I learned about sassafrass from Blanford Nature Center, a place where I attended school.
-Movies. I like to watch lots of movies when all of my things are done.

What is one of your favorite things about Kalamazoo?

-The diversity and the closeness of the community even though it is a bigger city
-The community. Everyone works together.
-The people—love them!
-I love how friendly everyone is.
-I love the community and how there is always something to do.
The variety of different things to do, such as the different festivals (Ribfest, Island Fest, etc.)
-The connectivity with community.
Downtown. I love the events, restaurants, and all the activities to do downtown.
-The Kalamazoo Promise! And the diversity.
-Being away on my own and getting a good education.

Will you share with us something that has been on your mind lately (other than school-related)?

-Is it possible to go bald due to pulling out grey hairs?
-The new iphone. I have been interested in how “great” it is.
-My relationship with my aging animals/pets.
-Thinking about my family. We lost my grandfather last November, then my grandmother two weeks ago.
-At almost 22, I’ve made the decision to get closer with God and become more involved in the church.
-My trip to Virginia in November to visit my sister.
-My need to make time for self-care.
-How weird I think it is that I will be turning 22 years old soon.
-My trip that is coming up to Cedar Point with a few of my co-workers.
-How to grow a family business.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

-My mom. No one has been as supportive of me as she has been and she motivates me to go for my dreams.
-My father has been my caring adult since the day I was born. Also, my loving mother.
-My mom and grandparents.
-My mom.
-My grandmother.
-My mother and father.
-My caring adult has been my mom. She’s always so supporting and encouraging.
-My mom, because she does a lot for me and is always there for me.
-My mom has always been my biggest cheerleader.
-Mom, for sure!

 

Pop Quiz: Lenny Williams

IMG_3000Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Lenny Williams, who is about to begin middle school at Maple Street Magnet School for the Arts. We sat down with him at the end of last school year, just as he was preparing to graduate from Arcadia Elementary School.

POP QUIZ

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

I’ve learned something about history. I’ve learned about slavery and about a man named Jacob who would go claiming lands for his people and then he was mistreating people who were slaves. He’d hit them. He wasn’t a nice guy. I learned that from Ms. [Donna] Judd. She teaches me social studies and science.

What are you currently reading?

The Magic Treehouse series. Right now I’m reading Sunset of the Sabertooth where they find the saber tooth tiger. I really like the Magic Treehouse books.

What’s your favorite word right now?

Go! As in, I go to the car.

What college or colleges are you considering going to and taking advantage of the Kalamazoo Promise?

I want to be a Spartan. And I’ll be a football player for Michigan State.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

A football player.

Do you have a backup plan?

My back up plan is to play basketball.

Do you have a backup to your backup plan?

I also could study math, history, and science. I like those things too. Ms. [Ci’Erah] Bell taught me math last year. She taught me stuff I didn’t know, like adding fractions and subtracting fractions.

Even though you don’t have to make those decisions now, it sounds like you have talents and interests in a number of areas so you’ll have some good choices when the time comes.

Yea, I think so too.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

My whole family. My dad, my mom, and my sisters who are in high school. They help me with my algebra and problems that I do not know. I’d also say my Principal, Mr. [Greg] Socha. He is very nice. He checks on us every day to make sure we’re safe and sometimes he’s even helps us with our work when he’s in the classroom.

Anything else we should know about you?

I like school.

Thank you, Lenny!

Lenny will be featured in our upcoming newsletter, CIS Connections, where he reflects on his elementary years and the school and community supports that helped him succeed. You won’t want to miss it!

 

Pop Quiz: Precious Miller

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. During the last week of school, a beautiful June day, we sat down with Precious Miller, who was wrapping up her first year as the Communities In Schools Site Coordinator at Hillside Middle School.

FB_IMG_1467148577246 (2)In 2010, Precious interned with CIS at Kalamazoo Central High School. She later served as a Youth Development Worker for the 2011 CIS Think Summer! program. With her Bachelors and Masters in Social Work from Western Michigan University, Precious served as a case manager with Casemanagement of Michigan before rejoining the CIS team in October 2015, this time as a CIS Site Coordinator for Hillside Middle School. This past January, Precious and her husband (and former CIS Site Coordinator), Derek Miller, welcomed their son, Kai, into the world.

As we were about to spring this quiz on Precious, Shania Armstrong, a sixth grader looking forward to CIS Think Summer!, popped into Ms. Miller’s office. When she learned her site coordinator was being interviewed for the blog, she had this to say: “She’s an awesome person. She’s nice and I like her a lot. She makes me smile. Since I’ve met her, she’s been building up my confidence…”

Alright, Ms. Miller: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

POP QUIZ

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

I’m learning how to balance caring for my kids at school and caring for my son at home.

What’s the secret?

Leaving school at school and being present in the moment. I practice mindfulness. When I’m with Kai, I catch myself thinking about the kids and all I need to do at school, and then it’s flip-flopped when I’m with the students. So, I remind myself to stay in the moment.

Favorite word right now?

I’m going to go with awesome because I hear it at least twice a day and I say it 10,000 times a day. If I see two kids skipping class, I say, “I see two awesome kids going to class.” And they do.

What are you currently reading?

I’m just about to start reading In a Rocket Made of Ice by Gail Gutradt. My VISTA, Terra, gave it to me. It’s about children growing up with AIDS. I understand that AmeriCorps ties into it, servicing a community that needs advocacy.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

I want to be a community changer, starting with one student at a time. My work doesn’t stop—whether I’m here or not. It can happen at the grocery store, the park, anywhere, and I’ll see kids that need a little reminder that they’re awesome.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

Diane McKinney. She was my inspiration when I attended Creston High School in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She was the school social worker. I remember going to her office every day at lunch. And while I didn’t need anything in particular, I remember I just wanted to be with her. I loved how she nurtured my becoming a woman and I can’t even articulate how she did it. It was really her presence that spoke to me. I love how she cared for me.

I can’t help but think about that young woman, Shania, and what she had to say about you. Here you are now, giving back in a manner similar to Ms. McKinney.

I had no idea I did that for Shania. Like so many kids, she just needs a little bit of hope in realizing who she is.

Thank you, Precious!

Over this past school year, we’ve introduced you to members of the wonderful CIS Site Team at Hillside. We kicked it off with Principal McKissack. If you missed the post, you can find it here. Read about CIS After School Coordinator Katherine Williamson here and CIS AmeriCorps VISTA Terra Mosqueda here. Former Youth Development Workers Nicholas Keen and Fred Myles were also featured. Nicholas won’t be returning in the new school year as he has relocated to Hawaii to accept a teaching position, and Fred’s business has really taken off. Good for them, but our loss! While we and our kids will miss them both, we wish them all the best.

Hillside and other schools need energetic and enthusiastic youth development workers to serve in an after school setting (Monday through Thursday). Help us recruit for kids! If you or someone you know might be right for the job, go here.

Pop Quiz: Alex-Saundra Hudson 

Ms. Alex working during CIS Think Summer!
Ms. Alex working during CIS Think Summer!

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Alex-Saundra Hudson, or, as she is known by students in the CIS Think Summer! Program, “Ms. Alex.”Alex's graduation photo As a proud 2015 graduate of Kalamazoo Central High School, she is now a Promise Scholar who has successfully completed her freshman year at Michigan State University. “Being in college,” she says, “and knowing how much everything costs, the Promise is definitely a blessing!” Alex is spending her summer as a youth development worker with Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. “I love what I’m doing!” says Alex.

Alright, Ms. Alex: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

POP QUIZ

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

I have a deeper understanding and appreciation that, as people, we are all different. It’s helpful to have an understanding that each kid has a different family background. Having that in your mind when you’re working with them is good to remember.

Favorite word?

Extraordinary.

What are you currently reading?

The only thing I have time to read right now is the Bible.

Thinking back to your years with the Kalamazoo Public Schools, who was one of your favorite teachers?

Oh, that’s hard to answer because I definitely had many great teachers, teachers like Ms. [Karen] Jansheski. She was my 8th grade English Teacher at Linden Grove. Also, I was an attention-seeker when I was younger so in my elementary years—I came to KPS in fourth grade—Ms. [Tracey Sanders] Pierce was great with me. She was the behavior specialist at King-Westwood. At Kalamazoo Central, I had a lot of great teachers there, but Ms. [Elaine] Sayre jumps out. She taught journalism, AP Language and I did an independent study with her my senior year. Also, Mr. [Joshua] Gottlieb. He taught physics.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Honestly, this job with CIS has helped a lot. It started out as a summer job, a way to make some money, but it has become an eye opener to my future. I was studying science at Michigan State and now I’m switching to Human Development and Family Studies. I always knew I wanted to work with kids in some way. This job has encouraged me. I enjoy it. It never feels like I’m at work, whereas, when I go to my second job—a large-scale retailer—I just dread going there.

I love the kids here and really enjoy the relationships I’ve formed. I envision doing something with my degree and probably going on to graduate school.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who is your caring adult?

My mom, definitely, and primarily because she has been a positive example. When I was six, and my sister was eight, she went back to finish her college degree in chemistry at Michigan State. When I was in high school, she started law school. She is taking the bar, starting tomorrow. She always pushes me and my sister to do our best.

I would also have to say my high school track coaches, Coach Jaime Gordon, Coach Hal Bates, Coach Richard Grayson, and Coach Calvin Cheatham have been there for me. I just finished my freshman year of college and they were a huge support system. They texted me to see how I was balancing track and school. Checking up and making sure I’m doing what I need to be doing is really helpful.

Thank you, Ms. Alex!

If you or someone you know might want to be a youth development worker with CIS click here for more information.

IMG_3161

 

Pop Quiz: Fred Myles

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Fred Myles.

A native of Kalamazoo, Fred or “Mr. Fred” as the students know him around Hillside Middle School, is in his second year as a Youth Development Worker (YDW) with Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. Fred has a wide range of interests, from college sports, to movies, traveling, and collecting toys from the 1980s. He also happens to be cousins with Carl Myles, retired Principal from Kalamazoo Central High School.

As a Youth Development Worker, Fred, like his title implies, develops the strengths and talents of youth by involving and empowering students in their own growth. “I’m accountable for the students we have each day, facilitating the daily schedule for the students we have enrolled in the program.” What Fred loves best about his job? “I love seeing kids opening up and wanting to be successful.”

Alright, Mr. Fred: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

POP QUIZ

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

I guess I’ve always known this but it’s only in my later years that I more fully recognize this: be accountable. Nobody but you can be responsible for yourself. And it’s important to focus in on something, to be responsible.

 

What one thing would you tell somebody who is considering being a Youth Development Worker with Communities In Schools?

Have patience. This work takes tremendous patience. Results with kids aren’t immediate. I see myself as a seed planter. The results may come at the end of the day, the week, the year, or even thirty years from now. All I know is I’m planting a seed. Someone else is watering that seed, and eventually someone else will see that child blooms. I just may not be the one to see it.

 

What are you currently reading?

Miracle Boys by Jacqueline Woodson. As part of CIS After School, I facilitate a book club every Thursday. Right now, we’re reading Miracle Boys. I’m enjoying it and it’s great to see so many of the students enjoying it. Some of these same students didn’t want to do the book club, refused to participate at first, but then after giving them a choice, letting them know that if we do this for half an hour then we can incorporate something they want to do, well, that helped. And now they’re reading and enjoying it. That’s gratifying.

 

What’s your favorite word right now?

Success.

 

What do you want to be when you grow up?

I’ve kind of already done that. I went to school for marketing and advertising. During the day I run my own marketing business, and then in the afternoons I come here to Hillside to work with the students.

 

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

My wife. She is supportive and she also holds me accountable. This benefits me and my business.

 

Thank you, Fred!

Our kids need more Youth Development Workers, enthusiastic and energetic individuals like Fred, to step up and serve in an after school setting (Monday through Thursday) and in our CIS Think Summer program. If you or someone you know might be right for the job, go here.