Steve Brewer: Celebrating the Small Victories of Student Success

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature CIS Site Coordinator Steve Brewer.

Born in Princeton, New Jersey, Steve Brewer was barely walking when he toddled off to Tubingen, Germany with his family. (His father had been awarded the John Wesley Scholarship to live in Germany.) After several years, the family returned to Lebanon, New Jersey. Eventually, the family settled in Spring Arbor, Michigan.

A graduate of Spring Arbor University, Steve majored in sociology and minored in psychology. Steve served two years, beginning in 2015, as an AmeriCorps VISTA at Edison and Northeastern elementary schools. Last year, he began as the CIS Site Coordinator for Northglade Montessori Magnet School and was the assistant coordinator for Literacy Buddies. As a full time CIS Site Coordinator, Steve is currently supporting Northglade as well as providing daytime and after school support to Edison Environmental Science Academy. While every school has its own unique culture, Steve says both schools share a passion for helping students learn and grow.

We met up with Steve at Northglade where he was meeting and greeting students in the hallway. It was just before Thanksgiving when we popped this quiz on him.

Alright, Steve: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

Pop Quiz

What is one of the best parts about being a CIS site coordinator?

One of my favorite times of the day is lunchtime. That’s when I check in with the students to find out how they are doing. Sometimes, I’ll just sit with them, sometimes eat lunch with them, or we might have lunch together in the CIS space.

I really like that we are doing important work. It’s work that wouldn’t be done if we weren’t here in the schools. It’s also good to know we are making an impact. Sometimes, it may not always be noticeable because often it’s small steps being made along the way. You know the saying: progress is made in inches instead of miles. It’s important to look at the big picture and recognize the small victories.

Can you share a small victory?

One of my small victories is that a student is now bringing his back pack to school each day. He wouldn’t bring it last year.

What is one of the most challenging aspects of being a site coordinator?

We still don’t have enough resources to take care of everybody. Take Northglade, for example. We have 224 students. We are not one of the higher poverty schools in the district, yet at least 70 percent of our students qualify for free and reduced lunch. By that measure, we may not have the highest need, but 70 percent is still 70 percent and that translates to a lot of needs. The community works with us to meet them, but it is still a challenge. For instance, our kids need coats and boots. Warm Kids—a great, long-time CIS partner—is providing us 20 brand new coats and 17 boots. That is wonderful. Still, we have more Northglade students who could benefit from these types of basic needs.

[As if on cue, Don Keller, a Northglade parent, enters the CIS room to donate several “Wish List” items for CIS Kids’ Closet, including some much needed coats. “I know that some of my kids’ friend’s may be in need of these items,” he says, as CIS intern Jessica Teske-Harden steps in to assist with the donation. Even though the Keller’s own children may not be the direct beneficiary of resources provided, Keller points out that his kids benefit when their classmates have their needs met. “We appreciate that CIS is in the school and that my wife and I can play a part.”]

The Kellers stopping by to support students through CIS Kids’ Closet.

You were meeting and greeting students in the hallway first thing this morning. Plus, you have had parents stopping into the CIS office. Can you give us a glimpse of what else goes on in the day of the life of a site coordinator?

I find first thing in the morning is a great way to connect with kids and get a sense of how things may be going. That’s why I’ll also stop into the cafeteria as students are eating breakfast. It gives the students the opportunity to reach out about something that may be on their mind. For instance, today two students needed CIS help. One involved a boot situation and one student just needed to connect and talk a little. Which reminds me, I have several calls to make about coats and boots and other basic needs!

Let’s see, what else is going on? I just completed the community feast spreadsheet and turned it into Trella [Artrella Cohn, CIS Senior Director of Community Engagement & Student Investment] so that 45 of our school’s families can have a thanksgiving meal they might otherwise not have. [While CIS staff like Steve are identifying families and doing the necessary paperwork, Hands Up Foundation, a fabulous CIS partner, works hard year-round raising the funds to make sure KPS—as well as families with children in the surrounding area—have a Thanksgiving dinner with all the fixings. This year, they provided over 1,000 Thanksgiving dinners to KPS families.]

Every day is different. Like right now, I have glasses on my mind. I’m in the process of reviewing a vision list. Every school year, throughout KPS, first, third, and fifth graders are screened for vision and tested to see if they need glasses. As a site coordinator, I’m looking at results and following up with parents whose children need further follow up. I’m calling them to see if they were able to get an appointment, if they need some kind of assistance with this, or we can help in any way. I’ve already set up an appointment for one family based on one of these calls.

I’m also working on student support plans for each of the students we serve. Jessie [Teske-Harden], our CIS intern through WMU School of Social Work, has been helping with these plans. She’s a great support for our kids.

I also have a little bit of work left to do for Girls on the Run. For our school’s team, I’ve identified two Girls on the Run coaches. One is a teacher and one person is with CIS After School. Both had expressed interest in doing this so that made it easy. I just gave them our partner’s website information they needed to register. Now I need to work on finding one or two more volunteers to serve as assistant coaches.

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

Decaf coffee isn’t caffeine-free, it just has less caffeine.

What are you currently reading?

Karl Marx: Greatness and Illusion by Gareth Stedman Jones.

What is your favorite word right now?

Sleep. I can’t get enough.

Where is one place in Kalamazoo you love hanging out?

Shakespeare’s Pub. My band plays there a lot in their lower level, and also I like to watch comedy there.

What’s the name of your band?

I’m in two, actually. One is called Bike Tuff, and the other is Pack Sounds. I play drums in both. Both could be considered kind of punk/alternative bands.

Behind every successful person is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

My dad. He gave me the several pushes I needed to get through college when it got tough.

Thank you, Steve, for hanging out with us at Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids.

Northglade Montessori Student Loves Learning

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Alysse, a fifth grader at Northglade Montessori Magnet School.

The third oldest of eight children, Alysse enjoys school and learning. She loves being part of CIS After School and is looking forward to attending Hillside Middle School next year.

This interview took place in Northglade’s CIS room.

Alright, Alysse: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

Pop Quiz

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned? 

Math. We’re doing times and division.

What are you currently reading? 

Some chapter books. I really like princess books.

What is your favorite word right now?

Alysse!

What do you enjoy doing?

I like working at math and science and social studies.

What do you want to be when you grow up? 

A special education teacher. I’d like to teach.

Do you have any favorite teachers who have helped you along the way?  

My teacher, Ms. [Amy] Callahan. She helps us with our work and she’s nice. And she gives us popcorn. 

Alysse with Mr. Steve

Behind every successful person is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult? 

[CIS After School Coordinator] Ms. Ashley [Serio]. She works in the after school program. I’ve known her for three years. She’s nice and she helps us with our homework and lets us read books…And Mr. Steve [Brewer], too. He takes people to his office and helps them. He’s caring. 

[Tom Talbot, who keeps Northglade looking good, stopped in to pick up a mop and bucket.]

Tom: Just need to clean up a little accident in one of the classrooms.

Alysse: Did someone throw up? 

Tom: They did. It’s getting to that time of season. Hey, I don’t think you’ve ever thrown up in all these years you’ve been here.

Alysse: I haven’t! Not ever in all these years. I never threw up in first or second or third or fourth and now fifth grade. That’s what? Almost six whole years of not throwing up! 

Mr. Steve: I haven’t thrown up either! 

[Alysse giggles. Tom heads out of the room with mop and bucket.] 

While it’s great that you haven’t thrown up in school, it’s even better that you are enjoying school so much and like working hard. What do you like to do when you aren’t doing school work? Do you have any hobbies?

I like playing outside. Also, going to the grocery store and getting snacks. I like playing on my tablet and playing in snow. 

Thank you, Alysse, for hanging out with us at Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids.

Then What Happened? A Conversation on Reading and Writing with Joe Novara

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature CIS friend, Joe Novara.

Joe was born and raised in Detroit. He and his wife Rosalie settled in Kalamazoo in 1975. Their three daughters all went through the Kalamazoo Public Schools, graduating from Kalamazoo Central High School. One daughter went to University of Michigan and two went to Michigan State University. The Novaras are grandparents to seven, soon to be eight, grandchildren.

As a young man, Joe set out to become a priest, attending Gregorian University in Rome, Italy where he studied theology (in Latin). A retired corporate trainer and freelance writer, Joe has written many books for youth and adults. He has donated more than a dozen of his works to Story Shares, a non-profit organization devoted to inspiring reading practice and improving literacy skills.

Alright, Joe Novara: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

Pop Quiz

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?

Fish are unpredictable. Last year at this time, my son-in-laws and I were catching steelhead and salmon in the Kalamazoo River. They were jumping all around the boat. This year, fishing in the same location—downstream from the Allegan Dam—we didn’t see one and we didn’t catch any. Now, what’s interesting is that at the Allegan Dam this year, the fish are jumping like crazy, but not downstream. You can’t count on them!

What are you currently reading?

I like popular fiction. I appreciate an interesting story. I’m also getting fussy as I get older. If I’m reading a book I think isn’t good, I put it down. I like to find something to sink my teeth into, and then I’ll read the whole thing.

What’s the title of a book you’ve sunk your teeth into, lately?

The Trespasser by Tana French.

What is your favorite word right now?

Truth. There is so much deception involved these days, I’ve been thinking about truth and lies in terms of politics and the elections, wondering, “Who’s lying, here?” So, truth!

A favorite restaurant in Kalamazoo?

We like to go to Saffron, especially for their lunch.

Behind every successful person is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

A classmate of mine. We were in seminary school together and he connected with me and helped me through a time of transition in my life.

I planted some trees in our backyard and call them Charlie’s Grove. He passed away a while ago, but for some reason I’ve been thinking about him recently…Charlie was generous in sharing his insights and observations. “Read this book,” he’d say. “Here’s what I’m thinking.” “What are you thinking about?” “Think about this.” One of the books he suggested was quite influential in helping me decide where I was and where I was going.

On your website, you say that “Writing is about sharing.”

I don’t think of the writer as a mad scientist up in their tower writing all alone. As a writer, you need people to read and interact with your work. Life is about sharing and conversation and so is writing. Delayed conversation, you could say! Writing is what you could have said if you thought about it later. You can form your thoughts and share what you see happening around you. It’s a way to be mindful of what’s going on in your life…

Where have the years gone? people will say. I like to say, It’s gone into my writing. Writing is a way to digest and share what’s gone on in your life. Writing allows you to track life, digest it, and reshape it, if you want.

If writing is sharing, what would you say reading is about?

There are three parts to that. Writing is a craft. It’s as much fun to do it well as sewing or any other craft. When we are reading, we can appreciate someone’s craft, and learn from it.

The second part is that reading bring insights. Reading helps tune you into what others are seeing and learning.

Plus, there is also the fun of simply reading a good story, to experience the emotion, puzzle, and satisfaction of a good story well told.

As you know—you’re the one who told us about this resource!–Story Shares is a non-profit devoted to inspiring reading practice and improving literacy skills. They stock their library with what they term “Relevant Reads”—books that are both compelling and approachable for struggling teen and young adult readers. We counted, and they have 13 of your stories on their on-line shelves. Tell us how you got involved with Story Shares.

I never wrote my stories with reluctant readers in mind. I wrote those stories aiming at the young adult market…. My writing is pretty straightforward. For many of the stories I sent to Story Shares, they’ve assessed them at a third and fourth grade reading level. Story Shares does a nice job of identifying the work in terms of grade levels, readability, and relevance.

How do you think of or define the term, “reluctant reader?”

Reluctance comes from a number of things. It could be a kid who struggles in reading. I have to decode everything and I need to work hard to do this, so I’d rather watch a movie. Or, it’s hard to sit still and focus. I’d rather be walking around than sitting here and reading.

When it comes to reluctant readers, subject matter is especially important. If you don’t hit that right on the head, these kid are going to say, This story doesn’t say anything to me so why should I bother to keep reading? If this book was a television show, they’d change the channel. Relevance is key.

What advice do you have for parents of reluctant readers?

Read to them. Let them see you reading. It’s important to model it and get them used to the medium of reading with books.

One really important thing I did with our girls as they were growing up—I think this would work well with kids whether reluctant readers or not—is encourage them to create their own stories. When it was bedtime, I’d get our girls to tell their own stories. I’d encourage them along by asking, Then what happened? So then they are roasting marshmallows and then what? A squirrel stole the marshmallow! Wow! And then what happened? She went up a tree? And then what did the squirrel do? And then? And then?

Asking “What then?” can spur imagination and get kids thinking and looking for secondary meaning in things. It’s no longer just, Here’s what I see or Here’s what it is. It becomes, What else do I see?

When we can get kids to see second possibilities, that’s the basis of appreciating poetry, metaphor and images, film, literature, and art. One of the secrets to encouraging possibilities and stoking imagination is to tell children jokes. Often, jokes involve double meanings. Kids like learning that words can convey more than one meaning and, in the process, they learn that there is more than one way to get at something.

What you are talking about—helping kids go beyond and search for that second “right” answer reminds me of the book, A Whack on the Side of the Head, which speaks to the role imagination plays in problem solving. So…anything else we should know? Any project you’re working on?

I have a book coming out today, as a matter of fact. It’s an e-book published by Gypsy Shadow.
I’m Here is about silver romance between older people in a retirement home.

Doesn’t sound like it would meet the relevance factor for reluctant readers.

[Laughs.] You’re right about that!

One last question. How does it feel being married to a Champ? [Joe is married to CIS volunteer Rosalie Novara. She received a Champ award in 2014 and you can read more about Rosalie, here.]

Joe and Rosalie at the 2014 Champ Celebration.

[Laughs.] I love it! I think it’s marvelous to be married to her. Her mind is so sharp and her energy is so high. She’s always looking for ways to help out in the community, like tutoring through CIS. She’s also certified as an SLD Read tutor. Rosalie is marvelous, and I say, more power to her!

Thank you, Joe, for hanging out with us at Ask Me About My 12,000+ Kids.

DR. KELVIN LEE: RELEASING POTENTIAL AND FINISHING EMPTY

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Dr. Kelvin Lee, a former CIS board member and business person with a new book out, F.I.T (Finding Irreplaceable Talent) For Your Organization.

We met with Dr. Lee at the Getman Corporation, where he is the executive face of the Kalamazoo facility. Getman is a manufacturer of mining utility vehicles. A global company with humble roots, Getman’s success began with the 1954 creation of a motorized wheelbarrow. (Fun fact: This wheelbarrow was used to transport concrete for construction projects, including the Mackinac Bridge.) Today, with world-wide headquarters in Bangor, Michigan, Getman sells and supports their products on six continents.

Dr. Lee has humble roots, too. He grew up in Henning, Tennessee, a small town north of Memphis. (Henning is also the childhood hometown of writer, Alex Haley.) He holds a doctorate in management and organizational behavior and has been in management for over 30 years. For the past six years, he’s also been teaching business and leadership courses as an on-line adjunct professor for Ohio Christian University. “I find it rewarding,” he says. “I like helping people and working through this platform to help others find their purpose.”

Alright, Dr. Lee: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck. 

Pop Quiz 

Where do you fit in? That is a question you pose within your new book, F.I.T., and it is an excellent question on many levels. Kids ask that question practically every day: Where do I fit in? Could you unpack that question for us, in regards to work and life. 

It’s both. When we talk about F.I.T., we’re talking about purpose in work and life. Let’s imagine we were to go outside right now and raise the hood of my car. You could see the battery, the sparkplug, the terminal lead, and carburetor. Each one of those components is a leader in its department. So the battery is a leader in the battery or electricity department. That is its only function and there is no other part that can do what a battery does.

Think about it. No other part can do what a battery does! So it’s important to understand your purpose so you’re not wasting time and energy trying to be a carburetor when you are meant to be a battery. But try to be a tailpipe when you are meant to be a battery and all you will do is blow smoke. Where you fit directly equates to your purpose in life.

It’s also important to understand not just what you do, but why you do it.

Let’s think about the car again. All of those things under the hood is the environment and each one of those parts is placed in its environment where each part has the most impact. If you put the battery where the carburetor is, it won’t do much good. You put them in the right place so they can make the most impact.

The purpose of any talent in life—whether it be organization or home—is not to die old, but to die empty. It is about going to the end of yourself and depositing your gifts into this life for your generation and those to come.

Not to die old, but to die empty?

Think about it. A battery is full of power and potential. A battery will deplete its power before it disintegrates. The spark plugs will go to the length of their life before they explode or meltdown. For us, we are full of potential. We want to release our potential and die empty, not go through life and just die old. So, I want to die empty of my gifts and not die old full of them!

…The graveyard is one of the richest places in the world, because it has books that have never been written, music that has never been composed, paintings that have never been painted. That is because some people did not die empty. They did not deposit their gifts into this life.

As leaders, it is our responsibility to ensure our people go through the organization releasing their potential and going to the end of themselves.

When it comes to finding talent, what is a common mistake employers and employees make?

As mentioned earlier: Everybody is trying to be a spark plug. When leaders won’t let employees release their potential, that’s a problem. A battery is designed to give power. The terminals only transfer power. The terminal is not there to generate power. They are simply there to transfer power so the other parts can do their job.

Spark plugs produce energy to push other parts into motion. Within organizations, some people’s only purpose is to transfer power but they end up trying to be a spark plug or battery. Because they try to be a spark plug when they are meant to be a carburetor, they cause fires that leads to firefighting. A spark plug can spark all it wants but if it’s in the wrong place, it’s not going to do any good.

Each individual is part of the greater whole. It’s important for everyone to understand their part. And if someone doesn’t see how they fit, they end up disengaged, stealing company time, not taking care of company property, and not taking care of each other. It creates hidden costs.

What are you? A battery? A spark plug?

An owner’s manual. I help people understand their purpose and potential. There is also a trouble shooting section within the manual and what happens if you don’t follow that potential. 

When did you discover you were an owner’s manual? 

I was in Japan, serving in the military. I was attending this speech given by a Japanese speaker. He was talking about purpose. I sat back and pondered what he was saying. That’s when I realized: I’m a manual! I’ve always been a magnet for people…Back then, I had a Toyota Corolla that I bought for 700 dollars and used for the two years I was over there. I started thinking about that car and the problems I’d encountered with it, as well as the creator of the car who was not there to help. But the car came with a manual. And that manual helped me. It dawned on me that I’m meant to pour into the lives of other people, to share basic concepts about life to help them perform how they need to perform: to their maximum potential. 

Your book, F.I.T., came out in June. Can you catch us up with what’s happened since its release? 

It’s been selling well, but it’s not about the sale. It’s about dying empty and making an impact.

You are a busy man. When did you work on this? 

I wrote it over a span of one and a half years. I keep a notepad everywhere I go and jot down notes here and there. I’d jot down notes at lunchtime, in the middle of the night, take a few moments in the car.  

What most surprised you about the writing process? 

As a teacher, I sometimes take the long way of explaining things. For the book, I found I had to shorten my explanations, and take them from a scholarly level and break it down to a basic level. The process would be different, of course, depending on the audience you are writing to…I wanted to write this book for people who don’t know where they are going.

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned? 

I learn something every day. I’m a student of learning I read seven to ten books a month on various topics. Right now, I’m reading books on real estate, stocks, and animal life. I always read books to view new ways of looking at things.

Name of one of the books you currently reading. 

There’s a Spiritual Solution to Every Problem by Dr. Wayne Dyer. Everybody in life has a problem to solve. Based upon the problem, your value in life goes up when the problem is solved. People tend to run away from problems when the problem has been sent to give you value.

Are you always this deep in the morning?

We’re here to help each other see the deeper side of life. That’s why we’re here. 

What is your favorite word right now? 

Purpose. 

What is something you love about Kalamazoo? 

It’s good for family. For raising a family. My wife and I have an eleven-year-old and a four-year-old.

Behind every successful person is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult? 

My mom, quite naturally. I also have many friends and relatives in my life I consider my board of directors. I consult with them and seek their advice on many different things. They offer sound advice and have good judgment, and they too, are striving for a greater purpose.

At Communities In Schools, we believe that every child needs a marketable skill to use upon graduation. As you know, it’s one of our five CIS basics. As an employer, what marketable skills are you looking for right now? 

The most important marketable skill one can have is social intelligence, an ability to interact on an efficient level. You need that first…I’ve been a manager for more than 30 years. I’ve found that all people have gifts; the problem is that everybody doesn’t know how to take that gift and turn it into a skill. When a gift or talent becomes external, it becomes a skill. Once both gift and skill meet the problem, one of three things can happen. One: success. Two: wealth. Or three: greatness. 

All good things. 

Correct!

What advice do you have for the parents of our 12,000+ students? What can parents do to help prepare their child for today’s labor force? 

The one thing parents can do is respect the child for who they are; embrace their individualism! Every child is different and each has something different to deposit into this world.

Going to the end of ourselves is so important. By respecting their children for who they are as individuals, parents help their children make their deposits in this life. We don’t have to respect what they do, but it is important to respect them as a person who has potential.

Thank you, Dr. Lee, for hanging out with us at Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids.

Want to learn about the production process of building a Getman mining vehicle? Take this virtual tour offered on Getman’s website.

Pop Quiz: Danyelle Brown

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Danyelle Brown, a youth development worker (YDW) with Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo.

Danyelle got her start with CIS volunteering in the after school program at Northglade Montessori Magnet School. In January of 2018, Danielle was offered a position as a youth development worker. We were thrilled when she accepted!

Danyelle is from Detroit, Michigan and beginning her junior year at Western Michigan University, studying early childhood education.

“It’s amazing to get my feet wet with CIS and getting the opportunity to do what I’m going to be doing for the rest of my life!” Danyelle says.

[This interview took place during CIS Think Summer! You can find out more about Danyelle in the upcoming issue of CIS Connections.]

Alright, Danyelle: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

Pop Quiz

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned this summer?

I’ve learned patience. It’s definitely a process when it comes to behavior and meeting kids right where they are and working with them from that place that they are in.

Favorite word?

Reflection. I think that reflection is vital, especially working with children, it gives them an opportunity to acknowledge the things going on and, if necessary, can allow them to re-direct or correct themselves and move forward. With my kids, we do reflection every day, at the end of each day.

Reflection is an important skill to acquire, isn’t it?

Yes, it’s definitely a skill we need to teach. Sometimes, kids don’t even want to acknowledge the day that they’ve just had, but when they do, I find it modifies behavior, to say the least. Mistakes that they may have made are usually not made anymore.

What are you currently reading?

A really cool book! My kids and I just read Bigmama’s by Donald Crews. We all really enjoyed it. Just experiencing the joy they got out of reading that book got me excited in experiencing that with them!

What do you love about Kalamazoo?

Just one thing?

It can be more than one, if you’d like.

I love the environment of Kalamazoo and the people. It’s a very safe place. And a great place to raise a family, in my opinion. Though, I would prefer more shopping centers at the mall. That’s my only issue!

This city is not too big and not too small. It’s a good distance away from home. People here are so loving and friendly and I love that, since I’m a people-person. I’m accepted here, and appreciated.

What’s one of your favorite places in Kalamazoo?

My church, Mt. Zion Baptist Church. My pastor, Dr. Addis Moore, is so amazing. It’s a privilege to be able to sit under his great teaching. And everyone there is so loving.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who is one of your caring adults?

I have so many loving people, and have been fortunate to have a great support system, so it’s hard to choose just one, but I’m going to say my mother, Kallee Brown. That woman is amazing! She’s showered me with so much love and wisdom. She is the reason that I’m the woman I am today. I don’t know where I’d be without her. She is my superwoman.

What makes her super?

She has so much love. And she’s a mother to everyone. To her nephews, to children that aren’t her children, and you experience that love with just one encounter with her. She is loving and kind to all.

Thank you, Danyelle, for hanging out with us at Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids.

Our kids need more Youth Development Workers, enthusiastic individuals like Danyelle, to step up and serve after school (Monday through Thursday). If you or someone you know might be right for the job, go to CISKalamazoo.org and apply today!

An interview with friends, Zamya and Areli

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature two students who will be attending fifth grade this coming school year.

Zamya (left) and Areli at CIS Think Summer

While both go to different Kalamazoo Public Schools—Zamya attends King-Westwood Elementary School and Areli attends Arcadia Elementary School—they have become friends through CIS Think Summer!, which is designed to reduce summer learning loss and increase academic and enrichment opportunities.

[Note: CIS Think Summer! as well as CIS After School is available thanks to the support of federal dollars that are awarded through the Michigan Department of Education, the 21st Century Community Learning Centers. The considerable advocacy here and across the country for after school programs was effective for the 2018 year and funding for 21st Century Community Learning Centers was included in the budget bill passed by Congress, despite the recommendation to eliminate all funding for that purpose.]

Alright, Zamya and Areli: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

Pop Quiz

What is something interesting you’ve learned this summer?

Zamya: That you can have fun even though you’re doing math in school and it’s the summer.

Areli: That I really like science!

 

Favorite word?

Zamya: Fun. I’m really having fun this summer.

Areli: Tía. It means “aunt” in Spanish. I love my aunts.

 

What are you currently reading? 

Zamya and Areli: Out of My Mind!

Areli: We’re supposed to finish it by the end of summer and bring back to school.

Zamya: It’s a really good book.

 

What is one of your favorite things about being a student in KPS?

Zamya: Kids Hope [through Westwood Christian Reformed Church] is at my school. At the end of the year we had a celebration and this year we got a Rice Krispies watermelon treat.

Areli: I like that we get to do art. I love art!

 

What are your favorite subjects?

Zamya: Art. I want to be an artist and a gymnast when I grow up. I’m going to go to a multi-practice college that teaches you everything you need to know. My brother goes there. And then I’ll go to WMU and focus all on art.

Areli: I like art and want to be an artist when I grow up. I especially like to trace things. I traced a cat with wings on it and people say it looks good. I’m going to go to college where my cousin goes but I don’t know exactly where that is.

 

Okay, here’s a question I don’t think we’ve ever popped on anyone. What is the purpose of life?

Zamya: I feel like the purpose of life is worth living.

Areli: I was thinking about that too. I agree.

Zamya: You need to be living it. On the other hand, it’s hard to be living it…sometimes, you know, life might not always be fair. I first learned that from my mom. She’s told me that.

Areli: Life isn’t fair at all.

Zamya: Yes, you’re right.

Areli: Sometimes, it’s not even fair for dogs. I don’t like dog pounds. There shouldn’t be dog pounds.

 

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who is one of your caring adults?

Zamya: I have three moms.

Areli: My mom and dad and all my aunts and uncles. And my older cousins. They all care about me and take care of me and protect me.

 

Thank you, Zamya and Areli, for hanging out with us at Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids.